NPSHistory.com

CELEBRATING THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CENTENNIAL • 1916-2016
Copyright, Randall D. Payne
Shiloh National Military Park

The National Park Service commissioned Charley Harper to produce 10 posters commemorating the biological diversity represented by our national parks. Produced between the late 1970s and early 1990s, throughout this month's historical photos and art collection is a display of all 10 Charley Harper NPS posters. This month we are also highlighting the illustrations of Walter Weber, the National Park Service's Chief Scientific Illustrator from 1936-1941. Walter Weber went on to become the staff artist and naturalist for the National Geographic Society, whose illustrates graced the pages of National Geographic from 1949-1971. These illustrations were taken from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife (1942). The remaining photographs this month were extracted from the National Park Service's Natural History Handbook series.

Historical Photos and Art


The Sierra Range
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Grizzly Bear
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Olympic National Park
Mount Olympus, from Hoh-Soleduck Divide; Blue Glacier in the upper left.

(from Olympic National Park Natural History Handbook Series No. 1)


Olympic National Park
Draperies of clubmoss hang from the limbs in the rain forest.

(from Olympic National Park Natural History Handbook Series No. 1)


Olympic National Park
Numerous small islands and rocks add to the scenic beauty of the coast along the Olympic ocean strip. This is Abbey Island.

(from Olympic National Park Natural History Handbook Series No. 1)


Hawaii Volcanoes
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Rocky Mountain Bighorn
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Badlands National Park
The Badlands contain a myriad of erosional forms.

(Photo by South Dakota State Highway Commission, from Badlands National Park Natural History Handbook No. 2)


Badlands National Park
A young prairie dog at his den entrance.

(Photo by Carl P. Koford, from Badlands National Park Natural History Handbook No. 2)


Badlands National Park
The rocks exposed in the badlands are approximately 40 million years old.

(NPS Photo, from Badlands National Park Natural History Handbook No. 2)


The Coral Reef
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Sea Otter
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Great Smoky Mountains National Park
The Chimney Tops as seen from the transmountain road. This most photographed landmark towers above the head of the Sugarlands Valley. Many species of trees make up the dense forests, here and throughout the lower and middle altitudes.

(Tennessee Conservation Department Photo, from Great Smoky Mountains National Park Natural History Handbook No. 5)


Great Smoky Mountains National Park
The evergreen leaves of this catawha rhododendron (top) are wider and not as sharply pointed as the leaves of the rosebay or great white rhododendron. Temperatures as low as 20° below zero have been recorded in plades where these shrubs grow. Three petals, three sepals, and three leaves = trillium (bottom). This is the erect white species whose local name is "Stinking Willy".

(Tennessee Conservation Department photo (top), NPS Photo (bottom), from Great Smoky Mountains National Park Natural History Handbook No. 5)


Great Smoky Mountains National Park
One of the finest waterfalls in the park is Ramsey Cascades. It is reached by a trail which passes through a splendid forest of giant trees.

(NPS Photo, from Great Smoky Mountains National Park Natural History Handbook No. 5)


Atlantic Barrier Islands
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Pine Marten
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Saguaro National Park
Stately saguaros provide a wealth of vista for the photographer.

(NPS Photo, from Saguaro National Monument Natural History Handbook No. 5)


Saguaro National Park
Western diamond rattlesnake.

(NPS Photo, from Saguaro National Monument Natural History Handbook No. 5)


Saguaro National Park
The Cactus Forest has been called a wilderness of unreality.

(NPS Photo, from Saguaro National Monument Natural History Handbook No. 5)


Glacier Bay, Alaska
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Wolverine
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Rocky Mountain National Park
Notchtop and Little Matterhorn from Fern Lake.

(NPS Photo, from Rocky Mountain National Park Natural History Handbook No. 3)


Rocky Mountain National Park
The male bighorn display the horn which have made them famous.

(NPS Photo, from Rocky Mountain National Park Natural History Handbook No. 3)


Rocky Mountain National Park
The high mountain lakes are set among the scars of glacier excavation. Arrowhead Lake, in Gorge Lakes Canyon.

(NPS Photo, from Rocky Mountain National Park Natural History Handbook No. 3)


The Deserts
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Everlade Snail Kite
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Everglades National Park
(Betty Fraser Drawing, from Everglades Wildguide Natural History Series)


Everglades National Park
There are 52 color forms of Liguus fasciatus (tree snail) found in south Florida.

(Betty Fraser Drawing, from Everglades Wildguide Natural History Series)


Everglades National Park
(Betty Fraser Drawing, from Everglades Wildguide Natural History Series)


Canyon Country
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The California Condor
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument
Saguaro (left), organ pipe cactus (center), jumping cholla cactus (right).

(NPS Photo, from Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Natural History Handbook No. 6)


Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument
Great horned owl, shown here by a pool at night, often builds its nest in the forks of a saguaro.

(NPS Photo, from Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Natural History Handbook No. 6)


Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument
The pond at Quitobaquito Spring.

(NPS Photo, from Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Natural History Handbook No. 6)


The Alpine Northwest
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Whooping Crane
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Shenandoah National Park
(Bill Perry Photo, from The Nature of Shenandoah Natural History Series)


Shenandoah National Park
(NPS Photo, from The Nature of Shenandoah Natural History Series)


Shenandoah National Park
Big Run's quiet pools are good spots in which to look for wildlife.

(Hugh Crandall Photo, from The Nature of Shenandoah Natural History Series)


The Rocky Mountains
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Lobster
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Isle Royale National Park
(R. Janke Photo, from The Life of Isle Royale Natural History Series)


Isle Royale National Park
A wolf pack withdraws after an unsuccessful attack on a cow moose and a yearling (top); sparrow hawk (bottom).

(NPS Photo (top), J. Wiessinger (bottom), from The Life of Isle Royale Natural History Series)


Isle Royale National Park
(R. Janke Photo, from The Life of Isle Royale Natural History Series)


Isle Royale
(Artwork by Charley Harper)


The Atlantic Salmon
(Illustrations by Walter A. Weber, from Fading Trails: The Story of Endangered American Wildlife)


Glacier National Park
The sharp spire of little Matterhorn and the broad face of Mt. Edwards loom above Going-to-the-Sun Road in the upper McDonald Valley. During warm days in spring the valleys of the park resound with the thunder of avalanches.

(from Many-storied Mountains: The Life of Glacier National Park Natural History Series)


Glacier National Park
Moss campion and mountain forget-me-not (top) colonize a fellfield. Fellfields are rocky alpine sites that are slightly less than 50% bare rock, interspersed with such plant pioneers as cushion plants, mosses, and lichens. Indian paintbrush (bottom) is common at all elevations below tundra. It may be white, yellow, orange, pink or red. The actual flowers, inconspicuous and green, are surrounded by brilliantly colored bracts. Semi-parasitic on other plants, paintbrush is normally found growing in conjunction with other wildflowers; its roots steal sustenance from neighboring plants.

(from Many-storied Mountains: The Life of Glacier National Park Natural History Series)


Glacier National Park
(from Many-storied Mountains: The Life of Glacier National Park Natural History Series)