Gateway
National Recreation Area
New Jersey-New York
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Gateway to America

Gateway National Recreation Area embraces an area known for more than a century as the "Gateway to America." Covering more than 26,000 acres, the park extends from Sandy Hook, New Jersey, along the south side of Staten Island to Jamaica Bay and Breezy Point in New York. Assembled from city parks, military sites, and undeveloped land, Gateway weaves together history, nature, and recreation areas to create an extraordinary national park. Congress established Gateway National Recreation Area in 1972 as one of the first urban parks in the National Park System. Today the park showcases the importance of open space, adds to the quality of life for city residents, and preserves habitat for hundreds of species of plants and animals. This connection between ecological and urban systems is a hallmark of Gateway National Recreation Area.

Having Fun at Your Park Gateway National Recreation Area is a great waterfront park with outstanding recreational facilities for fun and self-expression. You can enjoy ocean swimming, sailing, sunbathing, and fishing. Off the beach, you can find places for cycling and jogging, golf and archery, hiking and horseback riding, and birdwatching, picnicking, or reading a book after a tough day at work. There are fields and courts for baseball, soccer, rugby, and basketball. If you feel a creative impulse, you'll find that the park is home to actors and artists, gardeners and musicians, modelmakers and astronomers. Best of all, Gateway is a place where you can choose to just relax in an exceptional setting.

Life-long Learning Gateway is more than a playground—it is an outdoor classroom where people of all ages can learn about history, nature, and stewardship. You can visit historical areas that explain the defense of New York Harbor, the growth of aviation, and the building of navigational aids that have guided ships in the harbor for centuries. If you like nature you can learn about ecosystems, shoreline dynamics, plants and animals, and more. Stewardship—saving our natural and cultural resources for future generations—is something everyone can enjoy. Activities range from butterfly counts to the preservation of historic aircraft. Help us safeguard this special place by treating it with care and respect. You can join in the commitment and be a steward for your national park.

A Closer Look at Nature

Protected/Preserved
Gateway's thousands of acres protect habitats as diverse as the sand dunes at Sandy Hook and the backwaters of Jamaica Bay. Our active resource management gives you a chance to enjoy outdoor experiences, from quiet walks in coastal woodlands to fun in the Atlantic surf.

Habitat Enhancement
Stewardship is an important principle of the National Park Service at Gateway. Rangers, volunteers, and environmental groups work together to accomplish environmental goals in the park, such as reestablishing grasslands and wetlands. You can help—call the park for information.

Plants to Surprise You
Trees as varied as holly and oak, grasses short or as tall as you, and wildflowers of all colors; grow profusely in the protected habitats at Gateway. Prickly pear cactus—a surprise to many visitors—is well adapted to the sandy, dry interdunal areas in the park.

Birds Galore
More than 330 species of birds—from as far north as the Arctic and as far south as South America—have been recorded in the park. Thousands rest and feed here during migrations along the Atlantic Flyway. Their numbers make Gateway one of the best birdwatching spots in the Northeast.

Animals on the Move
Gateway is a migratory bonanza. Bats, butterflies, birds, and fish stream through Gateway's rich environs on their annual migrations along the coast. Spring is marked by the return of horseshoe crabs to the park's shallow bays. In fall, thousands of hawks migrating south hunt along the dunes.

Defending New York

The United States defended its shores for centuries with a complex system of fortifications. One heavily defended area was New York City, the nation's center for business and finance. The harbor defense system started in lower Manhattan and eventually extended to Sandy Hook, New Jersey. Principally active during wartime, New York's harbor system defended the region until the late 20th century. Two of the best remnants of these harbor defenses are in the park.

Fort Wadsworth Staten Island's Fort Wadsworth—Guardian of the Narrows—guarded the entrance to New York Harbor for 200 years. Because of its strategic location, Fort Wadsworth continually evolved as new technology became available. From Battery Weed, the Civil War-era gun battery, to more modern anti-ship batteries that served through World War II, Fort Wadsworth presented a formidable defense. Today, you can see these fortifications while viewing the harbor from the city's highest point.

Fort Hancock The Sandy Hook Peninsula has long served as a site of military importance and innovative technological developments. In 1874, the U.S. Army established the nation's first weapons' proving ground here, and, in 1895, built Fort Hancock as the outermost defense point for New York City. Over the years, the defenses included concrete gun batteries, antiaircraft positions, and advanced Nike missiles. You can explore this 19th-century military post, one of the best preserved in the Northeast.

City by the Sea

Floyd Bennett Field Boasting of its strong concrete runways and modern facilities, Floyd Bennett Field opened as New York City's first municipal airport on May 23, 1931. In the 1930s the airfield became legendary for its record-breaking flights by aviators such as Wiley Post, Howard Hughes, and Jacqueline Cochran. Ownership of the field passed to the U.S. Navy in 1942, and it was the busiest military airport in the United States during World War II.

Jacob Riis Park In 1936 Robert Moses, the influential New York City parks commissioner and politician, designed Jacob Riis Park with an innovative eye for public space. The city developed the site in 1912 as a public beach, but Moses put forward plans that remodeled the bathhouse and introduced landscaped walkways, boardwalks, and courtyards. The site's name is a salute to Jacob Riis, the prominent social commentator and photographer. The park is a refreshing getaway on hot summer days.

Sandy Hook New York City merchants, wanting to guide cargo safely through the harbor to Manhattan, financed the building of the Sandy Hook Lighthouse. First lighted on June 11, 1764, the Sandy Hook Light is the oldest lighthouse in the nation, and it is still an active aid to navigation. The lighthouse originally stood at the end of the peninsula, but centuries of shifting currents have driven sand northward. Today, the lighthouse is more than a mile from the tip of the peninsula.

Enjoying Your National Recreation Area

Jamaica Bay

The park areas of Jamaica Bay, Floyd Bennett Field, and Breezy Point cover thousands of acres in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. You can explore natural and historic areas. Here you can relax alone or have fun with your friends and family. Call the park areas about activities, fees, facilities, permits, regulations, and safety.

Emergencies: 911
or U.S. Park Police: 718-338-3988

Floyd Bennett Field
Famous aviators used New York City's first municipal airport for record-breaking flights during the pioneering days of aviation. The field became one of the country's most important naval air stations. Activities: aircraft restoration, biking, birdwatching, exhibits, gardening, group camping, hiking, military history, nature study, picnicking.

Jacob Riis Park
New York City created this park in the early 1900s to give city residents a new seaside recreation area. Activities: basketball, biking, golf, paddle tennis, picnicking, sunbathing, swimming, volleyball. Caution: Lifeguards are on duty in summer only.

Fort Tilden
From World War I through the Vietnam War, this important fort defended New York Harbor. Activities: art exhibits, athletic fields, biking, birdwatching, hiking, military history, music and theater performances, nature study, picnicking.

Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge is one of the largest bird sanctuaries in the northeastern United States. More than 330 species of birds have made this an important stopping point along the Atlantic Flyway. Activities: birdwatching, hiking, nature-study programs.

Canarsie Pier
This historic pier offers you a place to relax or to do some of the best fishing on Jamaica Bay. Activities: playground, fishing, picnicking.

Frank Charles Memorial Park
This park's tree-lined paths in the Howard Beach section of Queens offer a refuge from urban life. Activities: baseball, basketball, handball, picnicking, playground, tennis, walking track.

Staten Island

The diversity of the Staten Island Unit reflects the character of the island, with open spaces and a history that dates to the early Dutch settlements. Sites extend along the south shore of the island and include Fort Wadsworth, Miller Field, and Great Kills Park. Natural habitats include shoreline and dunes, grassy uplands, woodlands, and freshwater wetlands. Call the park for information about activities, facilities, fees, permits, regulations, and safety.

Emergencies: 911
or U.S. Park Police: 718-338-3988

Fort Wadsworth
Fort Wadsworth is one of the oldest military sites in the United States. Remnants of military times that you can see and learn about include Civil War-era gun batteries and 20th-century anti-ship batteries. Activities: biking, birdwatching, fishing, hiking, panoramic views of New York City, ranger-led tours of historic fortifications, self-guiding tours.

Miller Field
This 187-acre open space is a mecca for thousands of people who enjoy organized athletics. Activities: biking, community gardening, hiking, organized sports, picnicking, playground.

Great Kills Park
This park on the southeastern tip of the island offers a quiet getaway in a coastal environment. Activities: beaches, biking, birdwatching, boating, fishing, hiking, in-line skating, jogging, nature study, picnicking, swimming. Caution: Lifeguards are on duty in summer only.

Sandy Hook

Sandy Hook features ocean beaches, Sandy Hook Bay, salt marshes, historic Fort Hancock, and Sandy Hook lighthouse. Hiking trails lead to dunes, ponds, a maritime holly forest, and some of the richest bird habitat in New Jersey.

Emergencies: 911 or Sandy Hook Ranger Station: 732-872-5900

Sandy Hook Visitor Center
The 1894 Spermaceti Cove Life-Saving Station serves as the park visitor center. Trails lead to salt marshes and a maritime holly forest. Activities: birdwatching, bookstore, exhibits, hiking, ranger-led tours, tour planning.

Beaches The six miles of ocean beaches here are among the finest on the New Jersey shore. From North Beach you can see a breathtaking view of the New York skyline. Activities: beachcombing, birdwatching, fishing, sunbathing, surfing, swimming, windsurfing. Caution: Lifeguards are on duty in summer only.

Fort Hancock
This coastal post was the outermost defense for New York Harbor from 1895 until 1974. The fort is a complex of more than 100 buildings and 12 gun batteries that dot the northern end of the Sandy Hook peninsula. Visit the Fort Hancock Museum, Battery Potter, parade ground, and History House, a restored officer's home. Activities: exhibits and historic sites (seasonal), military history.

Sandy Hook Lighthouse
The nation's oldest lighthouse has guided ships into New York harbor since 1764. Activities: lighthouse tours (seasonal).

Getting there

park map
(click for larger map)

Jamaica Bay Unit

Floyd Bennett Field
Subway: IRT #2 (#5 rush hour) to Flatbush Ave., take Q35 bus. Ask driver to let you off at the park.

Bus: Connect with Q35 green bus lines on Flatbush Ave., corner of Nostrand, Kings Hwy., Fillmore Ave., or Avenue U (Kings Plaza). Ask driver to let you off at park entrance.

Auto: Belt Pky. to Exit 11S; take Flatbush Ave. south to park entrance.

Jacob Riis/Fort Tilden
Subway: IRT #2 (#5 rush hour) to Flatbush Ave., take Q35 bus to park. Or: IND A or S to Rockaway Park, then Q35 or Q22 bus.

Bus: Connect with Q35 green lines on Flatbush Ave. at the corner of Nostrand, Kings Hwy., Fillmore Ave., or Avenue U (Kings Plaza), to Ft. Tilden or Riis Park. Or: Q21 or Q53 to Beach 116th St., then Q22 or Q35 to park.

Auto: Belt Pky. to Exit 11S, then Flatbush Ave. south across Marine Pky. Bridge to park. Or: Woodhaven Blvd. to Cross Bay Blvd, west on Beach Channel Drive to park.

Canarsie Pier
Mass transit: BMT L subway to Rockaway Pky., transfer to B42 bus to pier.

Auto: Belt Pky. to Exit 13, Rockaway Pky.

Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Subway: IND A to Broad Channel Station. Walk on Noel Rd. to Cross Bay Blvd., turn right, go about 3/4 mile to visitor center.

Bus: Green line Q21 from Liberty Ave. (Queens) or 116th St. (Rockaway). Or: Q53 Triboro express bus from 61st St. & Roosevelt Ave. (Queens) to refuge.

Auto: Belt Pky. to Exit 17, Cross Bay Blvd. Go south on Cross Bay Blvd. over North Channel Bridge. The refuge is about one mile past bridge at traffic light.

Staten Island Unit

Miller Field
Train: SIRT at Staten Island Ferry Terminal to New Dorp Station, then S76 bus to Miller Field.

Bus: S76 from Staten Island Ferry Terminal to New Dorp Lane and entrance to Miller Field.

Auto: Verrazano-Narrows Bridge from Brooklyn or the Goethals Bridge from New Jersey to the Staten Island Expressway, Rt. 278; take Hylan Blvd. exit. Go south on Hylan Blvd.; go east on New Dorp Ln.

Great Kills Park
Bus: S78 from Staten Island Ferry Terminal or S79 from 95th St. at 4th Ave., Brooklyn to the park entrance.

Auto: Verrazano-Narrows Bridge from Brooklyn or the Goethals Bridge from New Jersey to the Staten Island Expressway, Rt. 278; take Hylan Blvd. exit. Go south on Hylan Blvd. to park entrance.

Fort Wadsworth
Bus: S51 from Staten Island Ferry to park entrance on Bay St.

Auto: Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, after toll take Bay St. exit to park. Or, Staten Island Exp. (Rt.278) east to Bay St. exit; left at light and follow road to Bay St. and park.

Sandy Hook Unit

Sandy Hook
Train: New Jersey Transit's North Coast Line to Red Bank, then NJT M24 bus to Highlands

Bus: New Jersey Transit M24 bus stops near the park entrance. Academy Bus Lines from New York City to Highlands, NJ.

Auto: Garden State Pky. to Exit 117; follow Rt. 36 east for 12 miles to park. Boat: In the summer, ferry service operates between Manhattan and Sandy Hook. Call the park for information.

Planning Your Visit

Activities and Services
Contact the park about activities, services, and special events at the places you want to visit.

Events Calendar
A free quarterly calendar, Gateway Visitor Program Guide, describes activities and special events. Contact the park to get your copy.

Safety and Regulations
Ask the park for information about safety, regulations, and permits. • In natural areas watch out for ticks and poison ivy. Do not enter or disturb habitat areas. • Pets must be leashed at all times. • Swim only in guarded areas. • Drive carefully. Vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians share park roads. • All natural and cultural resources, including wildlife, rocks, plants, and structures are protected by federal law. Do not disturb or destroy.

Source: NPS Brochure (2001)


Establishment

Gateway National Recreation Area — Oct. 27, 1972


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Documents

A Background Study of Historic Land Use of the Gateway National Recreation, Staten Island Unit (Sherene Baugher-Perlin and Frederick A. Bluefield, July 1980)

A History of Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, New York (David A. Kimball, September 15, 1964)

A New Vision for a Great Urban National Park: Gateway National Recreation Area, Final General Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement (April 2014)

A Photographic Inventory of Diatoms, Jamaica Bay 1992 (J.T. Tanacredi, J. Pallias and A. Scaglione, July 5, 1985)

A Vision for Fort Hancock's Second Century, Sandy Hook, New Jersey (undated)

Adaptive Use of Fort Hancock and the Sandy Hook Proving Ground Historic District: Environmental Assessment (Sandy Hook Partners LLC, February 2002, revised July 2003)

Administration Building (The Ryan Center), Gateway National Recreation Area (Judith A. Quinn, 1994)

An Alternative for Gateway National Recreation Area (1988)

Basic Information: Gateway National Recreation Area, New York-New Jersey (September 1975)

Birds and The Potential for Bird Strikes at John F. Kennedy International Airport NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NAROSS/NRTR-92/11 (Curtice R. Griffin and Edwin Mark Hoopes, July 1992)

A History of Fort Wadsworth, New York Harbor Draft (Frederick R. Black, 1982)

Breeding Bird Surveys for Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NCBN/NRTR—2013/739 (Nellie Tsipoura, David S. Mizrahi and Mike Bisignano, May 2013)

Canarsie Pier (Richard Greenwood, June 1976)

Changes in Sea Level at Great Kills, Jamaica Bay, Riis Park, Sandy Hook, Gateway National Recreation Area (undated)

Coastal Geomorphology of the Ocean Shoreline, Gateway National Recreation Area: Natural Evolution and Cultural Modifications, a Synthesis NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/NERO/NRR-2010/184 (Norbert P. Psuty, Peter Dennehy, Tanya Silveira and Natalya Apostolou, March 2010)

Coastal Vulnerability Assessment of Gateway National Recreation Area (GATE) to Sea-Level Rise USGS Open-File Report 2004-1257 (Elizabeth A. Pendleton, E. Robert Thieler and S. Jeffress Williams, 2005)

Cultural Landscape Report for Floyd Bennett Field, Gateway National Recreation Area: Site History, Existing Conditions, Analysis and Evaluation Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation (Sarah K. Cody and John Auwaerter, 2009)

Cultural Landscape Report for Fort Hancock: Treatment Plan, Gateway National Recreation Area-Sandy Hook Unit (Lisa Nowak and H. Eliot Foulds, 2006)

Cultural Landscape Report for Fort Tilden, Gateway National Recreation Area, Rockaway Beach, New York: Site History, Existing Conditions, Analysis and Evaluation, Treatment Guidelines Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation (Christina Selvek and John Auwaerter, 2005 rev. 2013)

Cultural Landscape Report for Proving Ground and Wartime Expansion Areas, Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area (Norma E. Williams, July 1999)

Cultural Landscape Report for Sandy Hook Coastal Defense Batteries, Gateway National Recreation Area: Site History, Existing Conditions, Analysis and Evaluation, Treatment Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation (Timothy W. Layton and H. Eliot Foulds, 2010)

Cultural Landscape Report for the Battery Weed Headland, Fort Wadsworth, Gateway National Recreation Area: Site History, Existing Conditions, Analysis and Evaluation, Treatment Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation (Jean B. Gleisner and John Auwaerter, 2008)

Cultural Landscape Report: Jacobs Riis Park (1992)

Development Concept Plan, Environmental Assessment: Floyd Bennett Field, Gateway National Recreation Area, New York-New Jersey (September 1983)

Development Concept Plan, Environmental Assessment: Jacob Riis Park, Gateway National Recreation Area, New York-New Jersey (Draft June 1989)

Evaluating VDataum in Coastal Network Parks: Fire Island National Seashore, Gateway National Recreation Area, and Assateague Island National Seashore NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/NCBN/NRR-2016/1148 (David Ullman, Amanda Babson and Michael Bradley, March 2016)

Flora of Gateway National Recreation Area (Kathryn Venezia and Robert P. Cook, 1991)

Floyd Bennett Field Historic District (Ricardo Torres-Reyes and Richard Greenwood, April 1978)

Fort Hancock and the Sandy Hook Proving Ground Historic District (Ricardo Torres-Reyes and Richard Greenwood, 1978)

Fort Tilden Historic District (Ricardo Torres-Reyes and Richard Greenwood, 1978)

Foundation Document, Gateway National Recreation Area, New Jersey-New York (May 2017)

Foundation Document Overview, Gateway National Recreation Area, New Jersey-New York (January 2017)

Fort Hancock, Gateway National Recreation Area (Thomas J. Hoffman, 1990)

Fort Wadsworth: Cultural Significance and Evaluation of the 1995 Management Plan (Columbia University, Fall 2002)

Fort Wadsworth Site Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, Gateway National Recreation Area (November 1995)

Gateway National Recreation Area: A Proposal (1970)

Gateway National Recreation Area: Decisions Paper (1978)

Gateway National Recreation Area: A Premier Urban Park (1991)

Gateway to the Sea: Lecture Series in Celebration of The Year of the Coast (1980)

General History of The Jamaica Bay, Breezy Point, and Staten Island Units, Gateway National Recreation Area (Tony P. Wrenn, October 31, 1975, rev. 2002)

General Management Plan: Gateway National Recreation Area (August 1979)

Guardian Park: A History 1970-2003, Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area (Erin Biddinger, August 2003)

Historic Resource Study: A History of Fort Wadsworth, New York Harbor NPS Cultural Resources Management Study No. 7 (Frederick R. Black, 1983)

Historic Resource Study: Fort Hancock: 1895-1948 (Edwin C. Bearss, May 1981)

Historic Resource Study: Fort Hancock, 1948-1974 (Edwin C. Bearss, November 1982)

Historic Resource Study: The Sandy Hook Proving Ground, 1874-1919 (Edwin C. Bearss, September 1983)

Historic Resource Study: The Sandy Hook Defenses, 1857-1948, Gateway National Recreation Area, New York and New Jersey (Edwin C. Bearss, September 1983)

Historic Resources Study: Jamaica Bay: A History, Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Cultural Resources Management Study No. 3 (Frederick R. Black, 1981)

Historic Structure Report: Battery Potter, Mortar Battery, Battery Gunnison, Sandy Hook Unit Gateway National Recreation Area (James J. Lee III and Lauren Laham, 2007)

Historic Structure Report: Building 1, Fort Tilden Draft (Quinn Evans, Architects, May 25, 2007)

Historic Structure Report: Building 25, Enlisted Men's Barracks (Naomi D. Kroll and Sharon K. Ofenstein, February 2002)

Historic Structure Report: Building 32 Quartermaster's Storehouse, Fort Hancock, New Jersey, Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area (Judith Q. Sullivan, 1993)

Historic Structure Report/Architectural Data Section/Archeological Data Section, Vol. I: Floyd Bennett Field, Gateway National Recreation Area (Porter R. Blakemore and Dana C. Linck, May 1981)

Historic Structure Report/Architectural Data Section, Vol. II: Floyd Bennett Field, Gateway National Recreation Area (Susan Simpson, May 1981)

Historic Structure Report: Fort Hancock Gatehouse, Sandy Hook Unit, Sandy Hook, New Jersey, Gateway National Recreation Area (John A. Scott, April 2004)

Historic Structure Report/Historical Data Section: Fort Tilden, Gateway National Recreation Area, New York (Louis Torres, November 1980)

Historic Structure Report/Historical Data: Jacob Riis Park Historic District, Gateway National Recreation Area (Harlan D. Unrau, April 1981)

Historic Structure Report: Officers Club Building No. 114, Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area (James J. Lee III, June 2006)

Historic Structure Report: Spermaceti Cove Life-Saving Station, Fort Hancock, New Jersey Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area (James J. Lee III, 2008)

Historic Structure Report: Miller Field, The Seaplane Hangar (Building No. 38) — Historical Data and Archeological Data (Harlan D. Unrau and Jackie W. Powell, December 1981)

Historic Structure Report: The Administration Building (The Ryan Center), Gateway National Recreation Area, Floyd Bennett Field Unit, Brooklyn, New York (1994, published 2000)

Interpretive Prospectus, Gateway National Recreation Area (1978)

Inventory of Coastal Engineering Projects in Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NRSS/GRD/NRTR—2013/738 (Kate Dallas, Peter Ruggiero and Michael Berry, May 2013)

Inventory of Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies) at Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NCBN/NRTR-2010/296 (Nina Briggs, Eric G. Schneider, Jackie Sones and Kristen Puryear, March 2010)

Jacob Riis Historic District (Ricardo Torres-Reyes, 1978)

Jamaica Bay Fisheries Survey 1985-1986/1988-1989 (E. Ann Scaglione, January 3, 1991)

Jamaica Bay Junior Ranger, Gateway National Recreation Area (2011)

Jamaica Bay's Disappearing Marshes: Scientific Symposium and Public Forum Proceedings (March 3, 2004)

Long-term Resource Management Under a Changing Climate, Gateway National Recreation Area (Columbia University, April 2009)

Managing Birds and Controlling Aircraft in the Kennedy Airport-Jamaica bay Wildlife Refuge Complex: The need for hard data and soft opinions NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/BSO-RNR/NRTR/00-9 (Kevin M. Brown, R. Michael Erwin and Milo E. Richmond, October 1999)

Metrics of Resilience and Recovery in Breezy Point Tip, 2015-2016: Jamaica Bay Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/NCBN/NRR-2017/1515 (Norbert P. Psuty, Katherine Ames, Andrea Habeck, Elizabeth Haussner, William J. Schmelz, Kelly Butler and Joshua Greenberg, September 2017)

Metrics of Resilience and Recovery in Floyd Bennett Field South, 2014-2016: Jamaica Bay Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/NCBN/NRR—2017/1517 (Norbert P. Psuty, Katherine Ames, Andrea Habeck, Elizabeth Haussner, William J. Schmelz, Kelly Butler and Joshua Greenberg, September 2017)

Metrics of Resilience and Recovery in West Pond South, 2014-2016 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/NCBN/NRR—2017/1507 (Norbert P. Psuty, Monica Patel, Katherine Ames, Andrea Habeck, Elizabeth Haussner, William J. Schmelz, Kelly Butler and Joshua Greenberg, September 2017)

Metrics of Resilience and Recovery in Riding Academy North & South, 2014-2016, Jamaica Bay Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/NCBN/NRR—2017/1539 (Norbert P. Psuty, Monica Patel, Katherine Ames, Andrea Habeck, Elizabeth Haussner, William J. Schmelz, Julie Blum and Joshua Greenberg, October 2017)

Miller Army Air Field Historic District (Ricardo Torres-Reyes and Richard Greenwood, 1978)

Monitoring Salt Marsh Vegetation and Nekton at Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit: 2012 Summary Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2013/458 (Erika L. Nicosia, March 2013)

National Register of Historic Places Nomination Forms

Floyd Bennett Field Historic District (Richard Greenwood and Ricardo Torres, June 30, 1976, April 1978)

Fort Hancock Life-Saving Station (Spermaceti Cove No. 2 Life-Saving Station) (Ricardo Torres-Reyes and Jonathan Fricker, April 1975, updated March 1980)

Fort Hancock and the Sandy Hook Proving Ground Historic District (Harry Butowsky, June 20, 1982)

Fort Tilden Historic District (Dwight Pitcaithley and Michel Wurm, June 23, 1982)

Jacob Riis Park Historic District (Ricardo Torres-Reyes, February 15, 1977)

Miller Army Air Field Historic District (Richard E. Greenwood and Ricardo Torres-Reyes, June 28, 1976, April 1977)

Natural Resource Condition Assessment, Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GATE/NRR-2018/1774 (Brianne Walsh, Simon Costanzo and Dylan Taillie, October 2018)

Newsletter (Out of the Gateway): Winter 2011Summer 2012Fall 2012Spring 2013

Northeast Coastal Barrier Network Shoreline Position (1D) and Coastal Topographic (2D) Change Monitoring: 2012-2013 Annual Data Summary Report for Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2015/992 (Norbert P. Psuty, William Schmelz, David Riddell, Katy Ames and Kyle Nicholas, December 2015)

Northeast Coastal Barrier Network Shoreline Position (1D) and Coastal Topographic (2D) Change Monitoring: 2013-2014 Annual Summary Report for Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2016/1000 (Norbert P. Psuty, William Schmelz, Andrea Spahn, David Riddell, Katy Ames and Kyle Nicholas, January 2016)

Northeast Coastal Barrier Network Shoreline Position (1D) and Coastal Topographic (2D) Change Monitoring: 2014-2015 Annual Summary Report for Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2016/1003 (Norbert P. Psuty, Katy Ames and Andrea Spahn, January 2016)

Northeast Coastal Barrier Network Shoreline Position (1D) and Coastal Topographic (2D) Change Monitoring: 2015-2016 Annual Summary Report for Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2016/1072 (Norbert P. Psuty, Michael Endicott, Elizabeth Haussner and Andrea Spahn, December 2016)

Northeast Coastal Barrier Network Shoreline Position (1D) and Coastal Topographic (2D) Change Monitoring: 2016-2017 Annual Summary Report for Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2017/1118 (Norbert P. Psuty, Julie Blum and Andrea Habeck, September 2017)

Northeast Coastal Barrier Network Shoreline Position (1D) and Coastal Topographic (2D) Change Monitoring: 2017-2018 Annual Summary Report for Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2018/1181 (Norbert P. Psuty, Glenn Liu and Andrea Habeck, September 2018)

Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network Geomorphological Monitoring Protocol: Part I—Ocean Shoreline Position, Version 2 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/NCBN/NRR-2022/2415 (Norbert P. Psuty, Mark Duffy, Dennis E. Skidds, Tanya M. Silveira, Andrea Habeck, Katherine Ames and Glenn Liu, June 2022)

Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network Topographical Change (3D) Monitoring: 2016-2017 Report for Great Kills, Staten Island Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2018/1187 (Norbert P. Psuty, Kelly Butler, Katherine Ames, Andrea Habeck and William J. Schmelz, October 2018)

Preliminary Assessment of Diamondback Terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) Nesting Ecology at Sandy Hook, NJ, Gateway National Recreation Area: July-September 2002 NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NER/NRTR-2005/014 (Sylwia E. Ner and Russell L. Burke, February 2005)

Research Opportunities in the Natural and Social Sciences at the Jamaica Bay Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area (John Waldman, April 2008)

Riis Park: A Study of Use and Design (Project for Public Spaces, Inc., February 1977)

Sandy Hook Oral Histories

Segregation And Use At Riis Park, Gateway National Recreation Area (Terry Williams and William Kornblum, undated)

Shoreline Change Monitoring at Gateway National Recreation Area: 2006-2007 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NCBN/NRTR—2011/497 (Norbert P. Psuty, Tanya M. Silveira, Daniel Soda, Andrea Spahn, Paul Zarella, Jacob McDermott, William Hudacek and John Gagnon, November 2011)

Shoreline Change Monitoring at Gateway National Recreation Area: 2007-2008 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NCBN/NRTR—2011/498 (Norbert P. Psuty, Tanya M. Silveira, Daniel Soda, Andrea Spahn, Paul Zarella, Jacob McDermott, William Hudacek and John Gagnon, November 2011)

Shoreline Change Monitoring at Gateway National Recreation Area: 2008-2009 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NCBN/NRTR—2011/499 (Norbert P. Psuty, Tanya M. Silveira, Daniel Soda, Andrea Spahn, Paul Zarella, Jacob McDermott, William Hudacek and John Gagnon, November 2011)

Shoreline Change Monitoring at Gateway National Recreation Area: 2009-2010 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NCBN/NRTR—2011/500 (Norbert P. Psuty, Tanya M. Silveira, Daniel Soda, Andrea Spahn, Paul Zarella, Jacob McDermott, William Hudacek and John Gagnon, November 2011)

Shoreline Change Monitoring at Gateway National Recreation Area: 2010-2011 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NCBN/NRTR—2011/504 (Norbert P. Psuty, Jacob McDermott, Andrea Spahn, Daniel Soda, William Hudacek, John Gagnon and Lindsay Modugno, November 2011)

Shoreline Position Change Monitoring at Gateway National Recreation Area: 2017-2012 Trend Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/NCBN/NRDS-2016/1030 (Norbert P. Psuty, John Schmelz, Michael Towle and Andrea Spahn, June 2016)

State of the Park, Gateway National Recreation Area: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011

Sulfur Cycling in Salt Marshes of Jamaica Bay, Gateway National Recreation Area: Possible Links to Marsh Loss> NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NER/NRTR—2013/730 (J. Kirk Cochran, Alexander S. Kolker, David J. Hirschberg, Alisha A. Renfro, Christina Heilbrun, Steven Goodbred, Jr. and Aaron J. Beck, April 2013)

The Evolving Legacy of Jamaica Bay (undated)

The Gateway Gardens: A Resource for a Diverse Urban Population at Gateway National Recreation Area in New York City (Steven M. Marsh, 1998)

The Great Transformation: Exploring Jamaica Bay in the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries Through Newspaper Accounts, Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/NCBN/NRR-2018/1607 (John Waldman and William Solecki, March 2018)

The Lifesaving Service at Sandy Hook Station, 1854-1915 (Robert F. Bennett, 1976)

Vegetation Classification and Mapping at Gateway National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NER/NRTR-2008/107 (Gregory J. Edinger, Aissa L. Feldmann, Timothy G. Howard, John J. Schmid, Elizabeth Eastman, Ery Largay and Lesley A. Sneddon, February 2008)



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Last Updated: 23-Jun-2022