Glacier Bay
National Park and Preserve
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Wildness: Remote, Dynamic, and Intact

And so we arrive in Glacier Bay, a land reborn, a world returning to life, a living lesson in resilience. If ever we needed a place to intrigue and inspire us, to help us see all that's possible in nature and in ourselves, this is it. Glacier Bay is a homeland, a natural lab, a wilderness, a national park, a United Nations biosphere reserve, and a world heritage site. Not a bad resume for a young land, a new sea. Just 250 years ago, Glacier Bay was all glacier and no bay. A massive river of ice, roughly 100 miles long and thousands of feet deep, occupied the entire bay. Today, that glacier is gone, having retreated north. Fewer than a dozen smaller tidewater glaciers remain. Impressive in themselves, sequestered at the heads of their inlets in the upper bay, they flow from tall coastal mountains to the sea, and calve great shards of ice that bejewel cold waters with diamond-like bergs. They are witnesses to change, these rivers of ice. They invite us to slow down and breathe deeply of the cool ice age air, and to imagine, if only for a day, the way things used to be.

Connections with the Land

A journey through Glacier Bay is more than a journey through geography. It's a journey through time. We begin in the modern age and finish in the ice age, traveling north from the forested lower bay to the rocky, icy upper bay (roughly 65 miles). We pass through hundreds of bold changes and subtle transitions where plants and animals pioneer new ground and surprise even the most seasoned observers of nature. A bear crosses a glacier. A moose swims an inlet. A seedling spruce emerges from granite, reaching for the sky. Life is tough and tenacious here. No wonder Glacier Bay holds powerful stories, and attracts scientists, preservationists, and travelers from around the world.

One of those scientists was a plant ecologist from Minnesota, a quiet man with an easy smile who studied relationships. He came to Glacier Bay in 1916, and over several decades returned many times to make careful observations. His name was William S. Cooper. What he found so inspired him—a wild land, undefiled, untamed, returning to life in the wake of glacial recession—that he shared his findings with colleagues at the Ecological Society of America. Might it be possible, they asked, to preserve Glacier Bay? To keep it wild; as a place where nature can unfold in ways that will teach and enlighten us forever? Cooper knew the history of Glacier Bay. Tlingit people had occupied the area for countless generations, living in the shadows of glaciers, prospering from the bounty of the land and sea. Captain George Vancouver had sailed the area in 1794, and created a rough map that showed the bay filled with a single great glacier. Eighty-five years after Vancouver, naturalist/preservationist John Muir had visited the bay by canoe, and found the glacier receding as fast as a mile per year. Muir wrote about Glacier Bay with such lyrical heart—his words like music—that he changed America's national perception of Alaska from one of daunting cold to enchanting beauty.

Like the little plants he studied, William Cooper was tough and tenacious. And like John Muir, he found in Glacier Bay a power that inspired him to become something more than what he had been. He wrote letters, made personal appeals, and suffered criticism. No great act of public lands conservation is made without a fight. It paid off in 1925 when Glacier Bay became a national monument. Fifty-five years later. President Jimmy Carter signed the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act that created Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.

It would have made William Cooper smile and John Muir sing.

Haa aani a ya
This is our homeland...

In the late 1600s near present-day Bartlett Cove, an extended family of Tlingit harvests salmon at a summer fish camp. From spring through fall they travel widely, harvesting the resources they need to sustain them through the long winter. Their landscape is very different from today's marine bay—it was a grassy valley coursing with salmon-rich streams and scattered forests. Looming in the distance, a great glacier sits dormant, pausing before the cataclysmic advance that will force these people from their homes around 1750. But the Tlingit have proven resilient. They returned as the ice retreated and today claim Glacier Bay as their spiritual homeland.

Glaciers Advance, Glaciers Retreat

Until 10,000 years ago, continental-scale ice sheets came and went many times for seven million years. During this Great Ice Age these ice sheets would reach as far south as the upper Midwest of the United States.

Glacier Bay today is the product of the Little Ice Age, a geologically recent glacial advance in northern regions. The Little Ice Age reached its maximum extent about 1750.

Some glaciers are retreating here, others are advancing—unlike in some mountains in the contiguous United States where glaciers may soon be a thing of the past.

At Glacier Bay you can witness geologic processes and change usually barely noticed in the span of a human life. Compare this diagram with the 1680 Huna Tlingit scene on the other side. There was no Glacier Bay then, only a broad valley with a glacier moving down it.

The Little Ice Age came and went quickly by geologic measures. By 1750 the glacier reached its maximum, jutting into Icy Strait. But when Capt. George Vancouver sailed here 45 years later, the glacier had melted back five miles into Glacier Bay—which it had gouged out.

When conservationist John Muir traveled here in 1879 the glacier had retreated 40 more miles up the bay since Vancouver's visit. A renowned author, Muir captured the popular imagination about Alaska, attracting tourists to Glacier Bay. Like most people today, they came by ship.

Today you must travel 65 miles up the bay to view tidewater glaciers—a far cry from the glacier's 1750 maximum. Polar regions respond to changes in climate at faster rates than temperate and equatorial regions do. How will Glacier Bay change in your lifetime?

park map
(click for larger map)

Visiting the Park

West of Juneau in Southeast Alaska, the park and preserve are reached by boat or plane only. Park headquarters is 65 miles from Juneau at Bartlett Cove. It is 55 more miles from there to the tidewater glaciers. To learn about safety, access, trip planning, lodging, backcountry use, services, activities, river permits, or companies that offer services in the park, contact the park. The free park newspaper The Fairweather also offers this information.

Vessel permits are required before entering Glacier Bay from June 1 to August 31. Reservations are recommended. Some areas are closed or restricted because of bears, nesting birds, humpback whales, or other wildlife activity. Guard against hypothermia even in summer: rain gear, hat, gloves or mittens, and waterproof footgear are essential.

Comprised of 3.3 million acres of mountains, glaciers, forests, and waterways. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve are a highlight of the Inside Passage and part of a 25-million-acre World Heritage Site—one of the world's largest protected natural areas—designated by UNESCO.

Source: NPS Brochure (2011)


Establishment

World Heritage Site — 1992
Biosphere Reserve — 1986
Designated Wilderness — December 2, 1980
Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve — December 2, 1980
Glacier Bay National Monument — February 25, 1925


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Brochures ◆ Site Bulletins ◆ Trading Cards expand section

Documents

A Contribution to the History of the Glacier Bay National Monument (William S. Cooper, March 1956)

A Guide to Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska NPS Handbook #123 (1983)

A History of its Boundaries: Glacier Bay National Monument (John Kauffmann, 1954)

A Study of Traditional Use of Birds' Eggs By The Huna Tlingit NPS Technical Report NPS/CCSOUW/NRTR-2002-02 (Eugene S. Huhn, Darryll R. Johnson, Priscilla N. Russell and Thomas F. Thornton, September 2002)

Acoustic Bat Monitoring in Alaska National Parks 2016-2018 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/AKRO/NRR-2020/2096 (Paul A. Burger, March 2020)

Alaskaothyris Frosti, A Recently Named Devonian Brachiopod Genus and Species from the Brooks Range of Alaska (Robert B. Blodgett and Vincent L. Santucci, extract from Alaska Geology, Vol. 45 No. 9, May 2015, ©Alaska Geological Society)

Alsek River Visitor Use Management Plan, Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve (July 1989)

An Evaluation of Chinook Salmon Freshwater Habitat Use in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska NPS Technical Report NPS/NRWRD/NRTR-2004/321 (David L. Waltemyer and Chad Soiseth, April 2004)

An Inventory of Paleontological Resources from Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska (R.B. Blodgett, V.L. Santucci and L. Sharman, extract from Proceedings of the GWS Conference on Parks, Protected Areas, and Cultural Sites, 2011)

An Investigation of Glacial Outburst Floods from Abyss Lake, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska NPS Technical Report NPS/NRWRD/NRTR-2003/312 (J. Scott Grover, June 2003)

Bartlett Cove Comprehensive Design Plan Environmental Assessment, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska Final (September 1997)

Bear-Human Management Plan, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (May 2013)

Bears in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: Sightings, Human Interactions, and Research 2010-2017 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR-2020/2134 (Tania M. Lewis, Ashley E. Stanek and Kiana B. Young, June 2020)

Birds of Glacier Bay National Monument (Dennis (Ole) Wik, October 1967; G. Streveler, March 1968)

Climate Change Scenario Planning for Southeast Alaska Parks: Glacier Bay, Klondike, Sitka, and Wrangell-St. Elias NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/AKSO/NRR—2014/831 (Robert Winfree, Bud Rice, John Morris, Don Callaway, Don Weeks, Jeff Mow, Nancy Fresco and Lena Krutikov, July 2014)

Cruise report; R/V Alpha Helix Cruise-173 to western Prince William Sound, Yakutat Bay, and Glacier Bay National Park, northeastern Gulf of Alaska, August 17 - September 3, 1993 USGS Open-File Report 94-258 (E.A. Cowan, R.D. Powell, P.R. Carlson, R.E. Kayen, Jinkui Cai, K.C. Seramur and S.D. Zellers, 1994)

Culturally Modified Trees at Bartlett Cove, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska (Michael Lewis and Charles M. Mobley, 1994)

Data Quality Standards for Sea Otter Monitoring in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR-2018/1763 (Jamie N. Womble, Perry J. Williams, William F. Johnson and Louise F. Taylor-Thomas, September 2018)

Distribution and Abundance of Moose in Glacier Bay National Park NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR—2016/1122 (Tania M. Lewis and Kevin S. White, January 2016)

Distribution and Abundance of Mountain Goats in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR—2015/1094 (Tania M. Lewis and Kevin S. White, December 2015)

Final Report on Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve Paleontological Investigations of Robert B. Blodgett (Robert B. Blodgett, c2013)

Foundation Statement, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska (April 2010)

Foundation Document Overview, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska (January 2016)

General Management Plan, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska (September 1984)

Glacier Bay National Park Selected Fisheries Effort and Harvest: 2000-2015 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR—2018/1598 (Javan E. Bailey, Craig C. Murdoch and Chad R. Soiseth, February 2018)

Historic Resource Study: Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (Rick S. Kurtz, 1995)

Historic Structure Report: Glacier Bay Lodge Complex Historic District (Kathleen Wackrow, 2018)

Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters

Population Characteristics of Humpback Whales in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 1997 (Christine M. Gabriele, Janet L. Doherty and Alexander G. Andrews III, 1997)

Population Characteristics of Humpback Whales in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 1998 (Christine M. Gabriele and Janet L. Doherty, 1998)

Population Characteristics of Humpback Whales in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 1999 (Christine M. Gabriele, Janet L. Doherty and Tania M. Lewis, 1999)

Population Characteristics of Humpback Whales in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2000 (Christine M. Gabriele and Tracy E. Hart, 2000)

Population Characteristics of Humpback Whales in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2001 (Janet L. Doherty and Christine M. Gabriele, 2001)

Population Characteristics of Humpback Whales in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2002 (Janet L. Doherty and Christine M. Gabriele, 2002)

Results of Humpback Whale Population Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2003 (Janet L. Doherty and Christine M. Gabriele, 2003)

Results of Humpback Whale Population Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2004 (Janet L. Doherty and Christine M. Gabriele, 2004)

Results of Humpback Whale Population Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2005 (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, 2005)

Results of Humpback Whale Population Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2006 (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, 2006)

Results of Humpback Whale Population Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2007 (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, 2007)

Results of Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2008 Annual Progress Report (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, December 2008)

Results of Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2009 Annual Progress Report (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, 2009)

Results of Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2010 Annual Progress Report (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, 2010)

Results of Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters: 2011 Annual Progress Report (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, 2011)

Results of Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters 2012 Annual Progress Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/GLBA/NRTR—2013/796 (Janet L. Neilson, Christine M. Gabriele and Phoebe B.S. Vanselow, September 2013)

Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters 2013 NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/GLBA/NRTR—2014/886 (Janet L. Neilson, Christine M. Gabriele and Phoebe B.S. Vanselow, June 2014)

Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters 2014 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR—2015/949 (Janet L. Neilson, Christine M. Gabriele and Phoebe B.S. Vanselow, April 2015)

Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters 2015 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR—2016/1354 (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, December 2016)

Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters 2016 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR—2017/1503 (Janet L. Neilson, Christine M. Gabriele and Louise F. Taylor-Thomas, August 2017)

Humpback Whale Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Adjacent Waters 2017 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR—2018/1660 (Janet L. Neilson, Christine M. Gabriele and Louise F. Taylor-Thomas, June 2018)

Glacier Bay & Icy Strait Humpback Whale Population Monitoring: 2018 Update (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, March 29, 2019)

Glacier Bay & Icy Strait Humpback Whale Population Monitoring: 2019 Update (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, May 2020)

Glacier Bay & Icy Strait Humpback Whale Population Monitoring: 2020 Update (Janet L. Neilson and Christine M. Gabriele, July 2021)

Glacier Bay & Icy Strait Humpback Whale Population Monitoring: 2021 Update (Janet L. Neilson, Christine M. Gabriele and A.R Bendlin, January 2022)

Inventory of marine and estuarine fishes in Southeast Alaska National Parks during summer, 2001: Annual Report (Michael A. Litzow, John F. Piatt and Mayumi Arimitsu, March 2002)

Inventory of Marine and Estuarine Fishes in Southeast Alaska National Parks Final Report (Mayumi L. Arimitsu, Michael A. Litzow, John F. Piatt, Martin D. Robards, Alisa A. Abookire and Gary S. Drew, May 2003)

Kittlitz’s Murrelet Monitoring in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve 2010–2018: Synthesis and Program Review NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2019/1957 (Steven T. Hoekman, July 2019)

Land Reborn: A History of Administrative and Visitor Use in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (HTML edition) (Theodore Catton, 1995)

Lichens and associated fungi from Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska (Toby Spribille1, Alan M. Fryday, Sergio Pérez-Ortega, Måns Svensson, Tor Tønsberg, Stefan Ekman, Håkon Holien, Philipp Resl, Kevin Schneider, Edith Stabentheiner, Holger Thüs, Jan Vondrák and Lewis Sharman, extract from The Lichenologist, Vol. 52, 2020)

Long-Range Interpretive Plan: Yakutat Districts, Glacier Bay and Wrangell-St. Elias National Parks and Preserves (2001)

Map showing environmental geology of Gulf of Alaska coastal area, Glacier Bay National Monument USGS Miscellaneous Field Studies Map 1207 (B.F. Molnia and M.C. Wheeler, 1982)

Mineral Resources of Glacier Bay National Monument, Alaska USGS Professional Paper 632 (E.M. MacKevett Jr., D.A. Brew, C.C. Hawley, L.C. Huff, and James G. Smith, 1971)

Mineral resources of the Glacier Bay National Monument Wilderness Study Area, Alaska USGS Open-File Report 78-494 (David A. Brew, B.R. Johnson, Donald Grybeck, Andrew Griscom, D.F. Barnes, A.L. Kimball, J.C. Still and J.I. Rataj, 1978)

Monitoring Kittlitz's and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve

Monitoring Kittlitz's and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2009 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2011/440 (Steven T. Hoekman, Brendan J. Moynahan and Mark S. Lindberg, March 2011)

Monitoring Kittlitz's and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2010 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2011/441 (Steven T. Hoekman, Brendan J. Moynahan and Mark S. Lindberg, March 2011)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2011 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2013/811 (Steven T. Hoekman, Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, November 2013)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2012 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2013/810 (Steven T. Hoekman, Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, October 2013)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2013 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2014/841 (Steven T. Hoekman, Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, January 2014)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2014 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2014/925 (Christopher J. Sergeant, Steven T. Hoekman, William F. Johnson and Anne L. Schaefer, December 2014)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2015 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2015/1076 (Christopher J. Sergeant, Steven T. Hoekman and William F. Johnson, November 2015)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2016 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2017/1375 (Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, January 2017)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2017 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2017/1538 (Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, October 2017)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2018 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2018/1711 (Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, September 2018)

Monitoring Kittlitz’s and Marbled Murrelets in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: 2019 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2020/2063 (Steven T. Hoekman and William F. Johnson, January 2020)

Monitoring Population Status of Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris) in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska — Options and Considerations USGS Open-File Report 2015-1119 (G.G. Esslinger, D. Esler, S. Howlin and L.A. Starcevich, 2015)

Multibeam Bathymetry and Selected Perspective Views of Main Part of Glacier Bay, Alaska USGS Open-File Report 2002-391 (Paul R. Carlson, Philip Hooge, Guy Cochrane, Andrew Stevenson, Peter Dartnell and Kristen Lee, 2002)

Natural Resource Condition Assessment, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/GLBA/NRR-2017/1473 (Andy J. Nadeau, Kathy Allen, Anna Davis, Sarah Gardner, Kevin Benck, Mike Komp, Lonnie Meinke, Jacob Zanon and Andrew Robertson, July 2017)

Navigating Troubled Waters: A History of Commercial Fishing in Glacier Bay, Alaska (James Mackovjak, 2010)

Park Newspaper (The Fairweather): 200220042006200820112012201420152016201720182019202020212022

Preliminary hydrodynamic analysis of landslide-generated waves in Tidal Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska USGS Open-File Report 2003-411 (Eric L. Geist, Matthias Jakob, Gerald F. Wieczorek, and Peter Dartnell, 2003)

Quo vadis, Alsek? Climate-driven glacier retreat may change the course of a major river outlet in southern Alaska (Michael G. Loso, Christopher F. Larsen, Brandon S. Tober, Michael Christoffersen, Mark Fahnestock, John W. Holt and Martin Truffer, extract from Geomorphology, Vol. 384, March 17, 2021)

Relative Coastal Change-Potential Assessment of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve USGS Open-File Report 2005-1247 (Elizabeth A. Pendleton, E. Robert Thieler and S. Jeffress Williams, 2006)

Resource Brief: Bears of Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, A summary of bear management in 2020 and 2021 (K.B. Young and T.M. Lewis, December 16, 2021)

Sapelnikoviella Santuccii — A New Alaskan Silurian Brachiopod Genus and Species is Born (Robert B. Blodgett, extract from Alaska Geology, Vol. 43 No. 9, May 2013, ©Alaska Geological Society)

Sea Otter Monitoring Protocol for Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, Version SO-2017.1 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR-2018/1762 (Jamie N. Womble, Perry J. Williams, William F. Johnson, Louise F. Taylor-Thomas and Michael R. Bower, September 2018)

Sea Otters: A Keystone Species in Glacier Bay Resource Brief (Jamie Womble, July 2020)

Shallow and Deep Water Origins of Silurian Rocks at Glacier Bay, Alaska (David M. Rohr, Robert B. Blodgett, Vincent Santucci and Ladislav Slavik, extract from Alaska Park Science, v12(n1), June 2013)

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program: 2010 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2012/547 (Christopher J. Sergeant, William F. Johnson and Brendan J. Moynahan, February 2012)

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program: 2011 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2012/561 (Christopher J. Sergeant, William F. Johnson and Brendan J. Moynahan, March 2012)

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program: 2012 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2013/706 (Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, March 2013)

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program: 2013 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/SEAN/NRTR—2014/840 (Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, January 2014)

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program: 2014 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2015/927 (Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, February 2015)

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program: 2015 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2016/1131 (Christopher J. Sergeant and William F. Johnson, February 2016)

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program: 2016 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/SEAN/NRR—2017/1383 (Christopher J. Sergeant, William F. Johnson, February 2017)

Southeast Alaska Network Freshwater Water Quality Monitoring Program: 2017 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/SEAN/NRDS—2018/1144 (Christopher J. Sergeant, William F. Johnson, January 2018)

Spatio-Temporal Abundance of Sea Otters in Glacier Bay National Park from 1993 to 2018 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/SEAN/NRDS-2020/1283 (Jamie N. Womble, Perry J. Williams, Xinyi Lu, Louise F. Taylor and George G. Esslinger, June 2020)

State of the Park Report, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska State of the Park Series No. 52 (2017)

Statistical analysis of geochemical data from Glacier Bay National Monument, Alaska USGS Open-File Report 78-495 (Bruce R. Johnson, 1978)

Strategic Plan: 2000-2005, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (April 2000)

Taking the Long View: Twenty-six Years of Monitoring Glacier Bay's Largest Harbor Seal Aggregation Research Highlights (Deanna Ochs, April 2020)

The Hoonah Tlingit Cultural Landscape in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: An Archaeological and Geological Study (Aron L. Crowell, Wayne K. Howell, Daniel H. Mann and Gregory P. Streveler, 2013)

The Intertidal Life of Bartlett Cove, Glacier Bay National Monument, Gustavus, Alaska (David Duggins and James Quinn, 1979)

Vessel Quota and Operating Requirements, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska Draft (2003)

Vessel Quota and Operating Requirements, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska: Volume I (2003)

Vessel Quota and Operating Requirements, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska: Volume II (2003)

Wilderness Visitor Use Management Plan, Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve (July 1989)



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Last Updated: 28-May-2022