Channel Islands
National Park
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Nowhere Else On Earth

Something draws us to the sea and its islands. Maybe it is the thrill of traveling over water to an unfamiliar land. Or maybe it is the yearning for tranquility—to walk on a deserted beach with birds, salty breezes, and the rhythmic wash of waves as our companions. You don’t have to go far to find such a place. Off the coast of southern California the Channel Islands seem to float on the horizon like ribbons of dark rock. Named for the deep troughs that separate them from the mainland, the eight islands and their encircling waters are home to over 2,000 species of animals and plants—145 are found nowhere else on Earth. Isolation over thousands of years and the mingling of warm and cold ocean currents give rise to the rich biodiversity of these islands. Today, five of the islands, their submerged lands, and the waters within one nautical mile of each island are protected as Channel Islands National Park.

The Channel Islands from the Ice Ages to Today

Living Alone Lower ocean levels during the ice ages narrowed the distance across the Santa Barbara Channel and exposed some of the seafloor. The land offshore, easier to reach then, allowed some species to venture into this new territory. Mammoths swam the channel. Mice and foxes drifted over on rafts of vegetation. Plants and seeds floated. Birds flew. Later, water from melting glaciers raised the sea level. This widened the channel again and increased the isolation of animals and plants from the mainland.

Many species evolved over time and adapted to the isolated environment. Mammoths evolved to a new species of pygmy mammoth, and gray foxes shrank to the size of house cats, becoming today’s island fox. Species of mice, scrub jays, and many plants grew larger.

Kinship of Islands and Sea A powerful bond between the land and sea controls everything here, from where plants grow to when seals breed. Together, water currents, winds, and weather create an ecosystem that supports a rich diversity of life. Among the 2,000 species you will find here are northern fur seals, bright orange garibaldi (California’s state marine fish), some 28 species of whales and dolphins, intertidal dwellers like sea stars and surfgrass, and squid, a major link in the food chain as predator and prey.

People on the Islands The islands attracted seafaring people long ago; 13,000-year-old remains of a human leg bone found on Santa Rosa record the earliest known human presence in North America. Over time Chumash Indians settled on the northern islands, and Gabrieliño/Tongva settled the southern islands. Prosperous and industrious, the tribes joined in a trading network that extended up and down the coast and inland. The island Chumash used purple olivella shells to manufacture the main currency used for this commerce. The region’s temperate climate and bountiful natural resources later attracted Spanish explorers, missionaries, and ranchers.

In October 1542 Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo sailed into the Santa Barbara Channel. His expedition wintered on an island he called Isla de Posesión. On January 3, 1543, Cabrillo died from injuries and may have been buried on one of the islands, although his grave has never been found. Capt. George Vancouver gave the islands their present names in 1793. Early in the 1800s fur traders searched the coves for sea otters, seals, and sea lions, nearly hunting them to extinction.

By 1822 most Chumash had been moved to mainland missions. Fishing camps and ranching had become economic mainstays by the late 1800s. In the 1900s the military set up lookouts on Anacapa and Santa Barbara and practiced bombing raids on San Miguel. These activities had devastating effects on the island ecology, introducing alien plant and animal species that threatened to destroy the ecological dynamics of the islands. Today, ranching and other commercial and military activities have ceased and the islands are regaining some of their natural diversity.

Protection and Restoration Protection for the islands began in 1938 when Anacapa and Santa Barbara became Channel Islands National Monument. In 1980 Congress designated San Miguel, Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, Anacapa, Santa Barbara, and the submerged lands and waters within one nautical mile of each island as Channel Islands National Park. The waters extending out six nautical miles from each island are a National Marine Sanctuary. Channel Islands National Park monitors and protects threatened and endangered species, restores ecosystems, and preserves the natural and cultural resources for you and for generations to come.

A Safe Haven for Seabirds

The islands provide essential nesting and feeding grounds for 99 percent of seabirds in southern California. Eleven seabird species nest on the islands, including the only major breeding colony of California brown pelicans in the western United States. Not long ago they faced extinction.

In 1970 only one chick survived on West Anacapa. Scientists pinpointed DDT as the cause. They listed the species as endangered in 1970 and banned DDT in 1972. The fight to save the birds led to a remarkable recovery. In 2009 they were removed from the endangered list.

Visiting Channel Islands National Park

When was the last time you gazed at the ocean? Did you see the islands? Feel them call you? Savor the sea— its gulls, barking sea lions, and tiny creatures. Take time for a visit.

Eight Channel Islands range along the coast of southern California for 160 miles. San Miguel, Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, and Anacapa are the northernmost. Four islands lie to the south—San Nicolas, Santa Barbara, Santa Catalina, and San Clemente.

Visitor Centers The visitor center in Ventura has information, a film, an indoor marine life display, exhibits about the natural and cultural features of the islands, a native plant garden, and a bookstore. A small visitor center in Santa Barbara has information and exhibits. Both visitor centers are open daily, except Thanksgiving and December 25.

Planning Your Visit? Whether you go to the islands on your own boat or with a park concessioner, you should use the park website (www.nps.gov/ chis) to plan your visit. It describes the many tour options that are available and includes information about boat and airplane concessioners that can take you to the islands. It has detailed information about activities on the islands and in the water, boating safety, weather, park regulations, and more. Park staff can also help you plan your visit. Contact a visitor center for information.

Accessibility We strive to make our facilities, services, and programs accessible to all. For information go to a visitor center, ask a ranger, call, or check our website. The Ventura visitor center is accessible for visitors with special needs, but getting onto the islands can be difficult; ask for details. Service animals are welcome in the visitor center at Ventura. On the islands they are allowed only by permit from the superintendent.

Things to See and Do Visitors to the islands may swim, snorkel, hike, camp, watch wildlife, kayak, sail, and explore tidepools, beaches, and rugged canyons. Naturalists lead hikes. The kelp forests, caves, clear water, and rich diversity of animals and plants make this one of the top scuba diving sites in the world.

Protecting the Islands The islands’ natural and cultural resources, including all seabirds, marine mammals and other wildlife, plants and wildflowers, artifacts, structures, rocks, fossils, shells, and shipwrecks are protected by federal law—all collecting is illegal. Keep at least 100 yards away from marine mammals and seabirds. Fish and wildlife laws are strictly enforced. Staying on trails helps prevent erosion and protects fragile vegetation.

For Your Safety Be sure to check the park website for details about safety and regulations. • Weather conditions change rapidly; dress in layers. • There are no supplies on the islands. Take water, food, and other necessities. • Watch your step—ladders, railings, and stairs may be wet. • Stay back from cliff edges; they may be crumbly or undercut—a fall could be fatal. • Do not approach marine mammals like whales, seals, and sea lions. • Pets are prohibited on the islands. • Check for ticks and watch out for poison oak. • For firearms regulations ask a park ranger or check the park website.

WARNING Deer mice on the islands may carry diseases, including deadly hantavirus. Avoid all contact with mice and other wild animals. Keep food in rodent-proof containers.

In an emergency: On the islands contact a ranger. On the water use marine radio VHF channel 16.

park map
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San Miguel Island
This westernmost island receives the brunt of the northwesterly winds, fog, and severe weather from the open ocean. The cold, nutrient-rich water surrounding the 9,491-acre, eight-mile-long and four-mile-wide island is home for a diversity of sea life. Submerged rocks make the nearly 28-mile coastline a mariner’s nightmare. Rough seas and risky landings did not daunt the Chumash who lived here, nor did they deter the first European explorer, Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo, in 1542. Ranchers raised sheep from 1850 to 1948. Later the Navy used the island for a bombing range. Today, native species are making a recovery in this sanctuary.
Island Features: Chumash sites; Cabrillo Monument; caliche forest; seabird, seal, and sea lion rookeries.

Santa Rosa Island
The second-largest island, with 53,051 acres—15 miles long and 10 miles wide—beckons you with rolling hills, deep canyons, a coastal lagoon, and beaches adorned with sand dunes and driftwood. The Chumash called it Wima or “driftwood” because they built tomols, plank canoes, from logs brought ashore by channel currents. For thousands of years unusual animals and plants made the island their home. Flightless geese, giant mice, and pygmy mammoths are now extinct, while the island fox, spotted skunk, and munchkin dudleya (one of six plant species found only on this island) still live here.
Island Features: Chumash and ranching history; Torrey pines; snowy plover; Lobo Canyon; sand dunes; beaches.

Santa Cruz Island
Here are pristine beaches, rugged mountains, lonely canyons, grass-covered hills, and some animals and plants that you have never seen before. This paradise is Santa Cruz Island, a miniature of what southern California looked like over 100 years ago. The largest island in the national park, with 61,972 acres, Santa Cruz is 22 miles long and from two to six miles wide. A central valley splits the island along the Santa Cruz Island fault, with volcanic rock on the north and older sedimentary rock on the south. The Nature Conservancy and the National Park Service preserve and protect the island.
Island Features: historic ranches; island fox; island scrub jay; Painted Cave, one of the world’s largest sea caves.

Anacapa Island
Twelve miles from the mainland a five-mile-long spine of rock emerges from the ocean, breaks into three islets, and offers itself as home to 265 plants species and a bevy of seabirds—with the largest brown pelican rookery in the United States. On charts, the island of 737 acres appears as East, Middle, and West Anacapa. The Chumash call it Anyapakh or “mirage.” It was anything but a mirage on the night of December 2, 1853, when the sidewheel steamer Winfield Scott, running at full speed, crashed into rocks off Middle Anacapa and sank. The Coast Guard built a light beacon in 1912 and a light station in 1932.
Island Features: bird rookeries; Chumash middens; giant coreopsis; tidepools; kelp forests; sea caves; arches.

Santa Barbara Island
Steep cliffs of this smallest island—644 acres or about one square mile—rise above rocky shores to a grassy mesa flanked with twin peaks. Gabrieliño/Tongva Indians fished here. Explorers, seal and abalone hunters, ranchers, and the military took their toll. Today, after years of species and habitat loss, animals and native vegetation are making a remarkable recovery. Among those found here are Scripps’s murrelet, a seabird that nests in crevices in the cliffs, and the Santa Barbara Island live-forever, a rare plant found only on this island.
Island Features: seabird, seal, and sea lion rookeries; island night lizard; wildflowers; kelp forests.

Marine Protected Areas
Within the park and sanctuary is a network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) that provide a refuge for sea life and opportunities for recreation, education, and science. In 11 Marine Reserves, recreational fishing and commercial harvest are prohibited; limited fishing and harvest are allowed in two Marine Conservation Areas. The MPAs total 318 square miles, the largest such network off the continental United States. For more information visit www.nps.gov/chis.

Islands on the Edge
The Channel Islands lie in a region between the mainland coast and the deep ocean known as the Continental Shelf. The sea floor is made up of canyons, sea mounts, banks (underwater plateaus), escarpments, and deep basins (Santa Cruz Basin is deeper than Arizona’s Grand Canyon). This topography—shallow and deep, smooth and rugged, sunlit and dark—creates habitats for many species.

The islands rose from the ocean millions of years ago and were born of plate tectonics, volcanic activity, and fluctuating sea levels. These islands on the edge of the continent were never connected to the mainland. During the ice ages ocean levels dropped as the polar caps expanded. What are now San Miguel, Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, and Anacapa islands were once joined as a single island called Santarosae. When the sea rose again it created the four islands we see today.

Ocean currents also play a big role in the biodiversity of the islands. A cold current traveling south along the North Pacific coast meets at the Channel Islands with a warm current moving up from the tropics. Upwelling nutrients from the ocean floor mingle with the currents, mixing fish and other sea life into a living soup. Giant kelp forests encircle the islands and feed ocean visitors—from tiny plankton and sponges to giant blue whales.

Source: NPS Brochure (2018)


Establishment

Channel Islands National Park — March, 5, 1980
National Biosphere Reserve — 1976
Channel Islands National Monument — April 26, 1938


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Brochures ◆ Site Bulletins ◆ Trading Cards expand section

Documents

A Collaborative Science Agenda on Climate Change for Southern California Coastal National Parks NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/MEDN/NRR-2012/583 (Felicia Federico, Stacey Ostermann-Kelm, Christy Brigham and Paul Bunje, October 2012)

A Sea-Dominated National Park: Its Prospect and Its Proposal, Channel Islands National Monument (1963)

An Annotated Checklist of the Birds of Anacapa and Santa Barbara Islands (Lee Jones, 1973)

An Archaeological Overview of the Northern Channel Islands California including Santa Barbara Island (Michael A. Glassow, January 1977)

Anacapa Island Restoration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, Channel Islands National Park (October 2000)

Annual Administrative Reports for Prototype Parks, Channel Islands National Park (November 20, 1992)

Anthropogenic Climate Change in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA (Patrick Gonzalez, May 9, 2020)

Assessment of Coastal Water Resources and Watershed Conditions at Channel Islands National Park, California NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/NRWRD/NRTR-2006/354 (Diana L. Engle, August 2006)

Beached Shipwreck Archeology: Case Studies from Channel Islands National Park Submerged Resources Center Professional Report Number 18 (Matthew A. Russell, 2005)

Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Condition Report 2009, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (September 2009)

Condition Report 2016, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (2019)

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Establishment of Marine Reserves and Marine Conservation Areas, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (April 2007)

Final Environmental Impact Statement on the Proposed Channel Islands Marine Sanctuary (May 1980)

Final Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary — Volume I of II;: Final Management Plan (January 2009)

Final Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary — Volume II of II;: Final Environmental Impact Statement (November 2008)

Coastal vulnerability assessment of Channel Islands National Park (CHIS) to sea-level rise USGS Open-File Report 2005-1057 (Elizabeth A. Pendleton, E. Robert Thieler and S. Jeffress Williams, 2005)

Comet Submerged Cultural Resources Site Report: Channel Islands National Park Submerged Resources Center Professional Reports Number 17 (Matthew A. Russell, 2004)

Cultural Affiliation and Lineal Descent of Chumash Peoples in the Channel Islands and the Santa Monica Mountains, Final Report, Volume I (Sally McLendon and John R. Johnson, December 1999)

Documenting the Paleontological Resources of National Park Service Areas of the Southern California Coast and Islands (Justin S. Tweet, Vincent L. Santucci and Tim Connors, extract from Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist, v7 n1, January 2014)

Draft General Management Plan Supplement Environmental Assessment, Channel Islands National Park: Volume 1 (April 1984)

Enabling Legislation, Channel Islands National Park (1938, 1949, 1980)

Ecological Change on California's Channel Islands from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene ( Torben C. Rick, T. Scott Sillett, Cameron K. Ghalambor, Courtney A. Hofman, Katherine Ralls, R. Scott Anderson, Christina L. Boser, Todd J. Braje, Daniel R. Cayan, R. Terry Chesser, Paul W. Collins, Jon M. Erlandson, Kate R. Faulkner, Robert Fleischer, W. Chris Funk, Russell Galipeau, Ann Huston, Julie King, Lyndal Laughrin, Jesus Maldonado, Kathryn McEachern, Daniel R. Muhs, Seth D. Newsome, Leslie Reeder-Myers, Christopher Still and Scott A. Morrison, extract from BioScience, Vol. 64 Issue 8, August 2014)

Ethnohistorical Background of the Chumash People, Including a Search for Legal Right in Park Lands, for a General Management Plan of Channel Islands National Monument, California (Larry Van Horn, April 10, 1979)

Federal Interagency Riparian Assessment and Recommendations for Achieving Water Quality Management Goals, Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park NPS Technical Report NPS/NRWRD/NRTR-98/202 (Gary Rosenlieb, Bill Jackson, Cece Sellgren, Jim Wolf, Joel Wagner, Jeff Reiner, Kathryn McEachern and Don Pritchard, June 1995)

Final General Management Plan / Wilderness Study / Environmental Impact Statement, Channel Islands National Park (April 2015)

Foundation Document, Channel Islands National Park, California (February 2017)

Foundation Document Overview, Channel Islands National Park, California (January 2017)

General Ecological Monitoring Program Design, Implementation, and Applications: A Case Study from Channel Islands National Park, California (Gary E. Davis, 1997)

General Management Plan, Visitor Use / Interpretation / General Development, Channel Islands National Park: Volume 1 (Septemer 1980)

Historic Resource Study: Channel Islands National Monument and San Miguel Island, California (Lois Weinman Roberts, May 1979)

Historic Resource Study: Island Legacies: A History of the Islands Within Channel Islands National Park (D.S. (Dewey) Livingston, 2016)

Inventory and Monitoring of Natural Resources, Channel Islands National Park (Gary E. Davis and William L. Halvorson, October 1988)

Islapedia (Santa Cruz Island Foundation)

Junior Ranger Explorer Program, Channel Islands National Park (2014)

Junior Ranger Discovery Program, Channel Islands National Park (2014)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Handbook — Volume 1: Sampling Protocol (Gary E. Davis, David J. Kushner, Jennifer M. Mondragon. Jeff E. Mondragon, Derek Lerma and Daniel V. Richards, November 1997)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Handbook — Volume 2: Data Entry (David J. Kushner, Jeff E. Mondragon, Jennifer M. Mondragon and Derek Lerma, November 1997)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Reports

Kelp Forest Ecological Monitoring 1982-1989 Technical Report CHIS-97-05 (Daniel V. Richard, Constance Gramlich, Gary E. Davis and Mike McNulty, Draft 6/1997)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1990 Annual Report Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit Technical Report No. 52 — NPS/WRUC/NRTR 93-05 (Daniel Richards, William Avery and David Kushner, 1993)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1991 Annual Report Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit Technical Report No. 53 — NPS/WRUC/NRTR 93-06 (Daniel Richards, David Kushner and William Avery, 1993)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1992 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-94-01 (Daniel Richards and David Kushner, 1994)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1993 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-95-02 (David Kushner, Ronald Walder, Laura Gorodezky, Derek Lerma and Dan Richards, 1995)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1994 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-95-03 (David Kushner, Derek Lerma and Dan Richards, 1995)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1995 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-97-01 (David J. Kushner, Derek Lerma, Jeff Mondragon and Jennifer Morgan, 1995)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1996 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-97-04 (David J. Kushner, Jennifer Morgan, Jeff Mondragon and Derek Lerma, 1996)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1997 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-98-05 (David J. Kushner, Jennifer Morgan, Jeff Mondragon and Derek Lerma, 1997)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1998 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-99-1 (David J. Kushner, Derek Lerma, Stian Alesandrini and Jonathan Shaffer, 1998)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 1999 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-01-05 (David J. Kushner, Derek Lerma, Jonathan Shaffer and Barbara Hajduczek, 1999)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 2000 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-01-07 (David J. Kushner, Derek Lerma and Megan Donahue, 2000)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 2001 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-03-02 (David J. Kushner, Derek Lerma and Katherine C. Ugoretz, 2001)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 2002 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-07-01 (David J. Kushner, Paula Rich and Derek Lerma, 2002)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 2003 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-07-02 (David J. Kushner, Paula Rich and Jonathan Shaffer, 2003)

Kelp Forest Monitoring: 2004 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-07-03 (David J. Kushner, Paula Rich and Joshua Sprague, 2004)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2005 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2012/376 (David J. Kushner, Michael D. Moss, Joshua L. Sprague and Kelly J. Moore, September 2012)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2006 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2013/478 (David J. Kushner, Michael Moss, Joshua L. Sprague and Kelly J. Moore, April 2013)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2007 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2013/547 (Kelly J. Moore, Joshua L. Sprague, David J. Kushner and Michael Moss, September 2013)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2008 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2013/572 (Joshua L. Sprague, David J. Kushner and Kelly J. Moore, October 2013)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2009 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2013/581 (David J. Kushner, Kelly J. Moore, Eric A. Mooney, Sonia N. Ibarra, James R. Grunden and Jacob R. Metzger, November 2013)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2010 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2012/334 (Joshua L. Sprague, Kelly J. Moore, James R. Grunden, Sonia N. Ibarra, Eric A. Mooney, Gabriel Scheer and David J. Kushner, June 2012)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2011 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2013/480 (Joshua L. Sprague, Sarah B. Traiger, James R. Grunden, Sonia N. Ibarra, Eric A. Mooney, Kelly J. Moore and David J. Kushner, May 2013)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2012 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2013/479 (Joshua L. Sprague, Michael A. Civiello, David J. Kushner, Kelly J. Moore, Sarah N. Carter, Johnathan J. Centoni and Stacie M. Fejtek, April 2013)

Kelp Forest Monitoring Program: Annual Report 2013 NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2020/2146 (Joshua L. Sprague, David J. Kushner, Jaime McClain, James Grunden and Douglas Simpson, June 2020)

Land Bird Monitoring Handbook (Charles van Riper III, Mark K. Sogge and Charles Drost, October 1988)

Landbird Monitoring Reports

Landbird Monitoring: 2016 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Report NPS//NRR-2017/1546 (Linnea S. Hall, Peter Larramendy and Paula Power, November 2017)

Landbird Monitoring: 2017 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS//NRDS-2018/1190 (Linnea S. Hall, Peter Larramendy and Paula Power, November 2018)

Landbird Monitoring: 2018 Annual Report (Revised with Costs) NPS Natural Resource Report NPS//NRR-2020/2189 (Linnea S. Hall, Peter Larramendy, Lena Lee and Laura Shaskey, November 2020)

Master Plan Development Outline, Channel Islands NM, California (1963)

MEDN Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments (undated)

Montrose Settlements Restoration Program: Final Phase 2 Restoration Plan Environmental Assessment/Final Study (June 2012)

Museum Management Plan (Carola DeRooy, Phil Gensler, Steve Floray, Ann Huston and Diane Nicholson, 2005)

National Park Service Geologic Type Section Inventory, Mediterranean Coast Inventory & Monitoring Network NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/MEDN/NRR-2021/2279 (Tim Henderson, Justin S. Tweet, Vincent L. Santucci and Tim Connors, July 2021)

National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form

Anacapa Island Light Station (Jack Bookwalter, November 20, 1989)

Natural and Cultural Resources Management Annual Report: 1992, Channel Islands National Park (1992)

Natural and Cultural Resource Management Program and Addendum to the General Management Plan For Channel Islands National Park (September 1980)

Natural and Cultural Resource Management Program: An Addendum to the General Management Plan - revised May 1982 (March 1982)

Natural Resource Condition Assessment, Channel Islands National Park NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/CHIS//NRR-2019/1899 (Ana D. Davidson, A. Kathryn McEachern, Tim J. Coonan, W. Tim Bean, Amon J. Armstrong and Brian R. Hudgens, March 2019)

Natural Resources Monitoring Program: 1990 Status Report, Channel Islands National Park (Gary E. Davis and William L. Halvorson, December 15, 1990)

Paleontological Resource Inventory (Public Version), Channel Islands National Park NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/CHIS/NRR-2020/2171 (Justin S. Tweet, Vincent L. Santucci, Kenneth Convery, Jonathan Hoffman and Laura Kirn, September 2020)

Park Newspaper (Island Views/The Island Guide): 2002c200320062007-20082009-20102014

Plant Communities of Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit Technical Report No. 42 (Ronilee A. Clark, William L. Halvorson, Andell A. Sawdo and Karen C. Danielsen, October 1990)

Poster — Trophic Structure Biomass of Kelp Forest Fishes In and Adjacent to Four Marine Protected Areas in Channel Islands National Park (Parker H. House, Joshua Sprague and David Kushner, 2021)

Preliminary Historic Resources Study Santa Rosa Island (Bruce Craig, February 1984)

Preliminary Historic Resources Study of Eastern Santa Cruz Island (Bruce Craig, December 1983)

Preliminary Hydrologic and Geomorphic Analysis: Scorpion Creek Flood, December 5, 1997, Santa Cruz Island, Channel Islands National Park, California NPS Technical Report NPS/NRWRD/NRTR-98/172 (William L. Jackson, February 1998)

Programa Explorador de Jóvenes Guardaparques, Channel Islands National Park (2014)

Programa Descubridor de Jóvenes Guardaparques, Channel Islands National Park (2014)

Report on San Miguel Island of the Channel Islands, California (November 1, 1957)

Reptile and Amphibian Monitoring: 2010-2015 Annual Report, Channel Islands National Park NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/MEDN/NRR-2021/2266 (Timothy J. Coonan, Lena Lee and Laura Shaskey, June 2021)

Resources Management Division Role and Function, Channel Islands National Park (July 1993)

Resources Management Plan, Channel Islands National Park (undated)

Riparian System Recovery after Removal of Livestock from Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California NPS Technical Report NPS/NRWRD/NRTR-2004/324 (Joel Wagner, Michael Martin, Kate Roney Faulkner, Sarah Chaney, Kevin Noon, Marie Denn and Jeff Reiner, December 2004)

Rocky Intertidal Communities Monitoring Handbook (Daniel V. Richards and Gary E. Davis, October 1988)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring Reports

Rocky Intertidal Ecological Monitoring in Channel Islands National Park, California: 1982-83 Technical Report CHIS-86-002 (Daniel V. Richards, July xs1987)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring: 1986-1987 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-88-001 (Daniel V. Richards, 1988)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring: 1997 Annual Report Technical Report 98-07 (Daniel V. Richards, 1998)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring: 1998 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-2000-03 (Daniel V. Richards and Derek Lerma, December 4, 2000)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring: 2000 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-2005-05 (Daniel V. Richards and Derek Lerma, 2005)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring: 2001 Annual Report Technical Report CHIS-2005-08 (Daniel V. Richards and Derek Lerma, 2005)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2002 Annual Report NPS Natural Technical Resource Report NPS/MEDN/NRTR-2010/362 (Daniel V. Richards, Derek Lerma and Paula Rich, August 2010)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2003 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/CHIS/NRDS-2010/064 (Daniel V. Richards and Paula J. Rich, July 2010)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2004 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/CHIS/NRTR-2009/263 (Daniel V. Richards and Paula J. Rich, October 2009)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2005 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/CHIS/NRDS-2012/370 (Daniel V. Richards, Paula J. Rich and Stephen G. Whitaker, September 2012)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2006 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/CHIS/NRDS-2011/582 (Daniel V. Richards, Susie Tharratt and Stephen G. Whitaker, November 2013)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2007 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/CHIS/NRDS-2012/400 (Daniel V. Richards and Stephen G. Whitaker, October 2012)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2008 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/CHIS/NRDS-2012/401 (Daniel V. Richards and Stephen G. Whitaker, October 2012)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2009 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/CHIS/NRDS-2012/372 (Daniel V. Richards and Stephen G. Whitaker, September 2012)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2010 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/CHIS/NRDS-2012/371 (Stephen G. Whitaker and Daniel V. Richards, September 2012)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2012 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2015/1043 (Stephen G. Whitaker and Daniel V. Richards, September 2015)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2013 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2020/1305 (Stephen G. Whitaker, December 2020)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2014 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2020/1306 (Stephen G. Whitaker, December 2020)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2015-16 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2020/1310 (Stephen G. Whitaker, January 2021)

Rocky Intertidal Community Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park: 2016-17 Annual Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MEDN/NRDS-2021/1311 (Stephen G. Whitaker, January 2021)

Sand Beach Monitoring at Channel Islands National Park, 2007-2012 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/MEDN/NRR-2015/1049 (Daniel V. Richards and Stephen G. Whitaker, October 2015)

Santa Cruz Island Restoration Plan Final Environmental Impact Statment, Channel Islands National Park (June 2002)

Submerged Cultural Resources Assessment, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Intermountain Cultural Resource Centers Professional Papers Number 56 (Don P. Morris and James Lima, 1996)

The Distribution and Dynamics of Nighttime Lights in the Mediterranean Coast Network of Southern California: Cabrillo National Monument, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/MEDN/NRR—2016/1290 (Thomas W. Gillespie, Katherine S. Willis, Stacey Ostermann-Kelm, Olivia Jenkins, Felicia Federico, Travis Longcore, Lena Lee and Glen M. MacDonald, August 2016)

The Oceanic Park: An Administrative History of Channel Islands National Park (Lary M. Dilsaver and Timothy Babalis, April 2021)

Tree and shrub community monitoring protocol for Channel Islands National Park, California USGS Open-File Report 2000-74 (Kathryn McEachern, 2000)

Trends in Landbird Abundance at Channel Islands National Park, 1993-2009 NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/CHIS/NRTR-2011/507 (Timothy J. Coonan, Robert C. Klinger and Linda C. Dye, November 2011)

Wildland Fire Management Plan, Channel Islands National Park (2006)



Handbooks ◆ Books expand section

Videos

California Gray Whale (revised)

Official Film of Channel Islands National Park (24:09)



chis/index.htm
Last Updated: 10-Jun-2022