Joshua Tree
National Park
California
Logo
Park Photo
NPS photo



VARIED YET VULNERABLE

The desert has much to teach us about the marvels of adaptation. Relentless sun, little water, and summer temperatures over 100°F can make a forbidding world for non-desert dwellers. Yet hundreds of species conserve moisture and beat the heat in fascinating ways.

Hardy as these plants and animals are, their world is fragile. In the 1930s Minerva Hoyt, a community activist and desert-lover, recognized the threats from humans. She saw beauty in the spiny plants and slithery creatures where others did not. She persuaded President Franklin D. Roosevelt to proclaim Joshua Tree National Monument in 1936. In 1994, as part of the California Desert Protection Act, Congress renamed the area Joshua Tree National Park. Thanks to the efforts of Hoyt and others, this park protects 792,510 acres—more than 80 percent of it managed as wilderness—where the Mojave and Colorado deserts converge.

THE TRANSITION ZONE Deserts don't have firm boundaries, and much of the park lies in the overlap between the Colorado and Mojave deserts. This transition zone has a wealth of biological diversity and is home to species characteristic of each desert ecosystem. Some residents include: Bighorn sheep, Chuckwalla, Cactus wren, Beavertail cactus, Greater roadrunner, Gambel's quail, Desert tortoise and Desert iguana.

MOJAVE DESERT The western half of the park, at elevations above 3,000 feet, is Mojave Desert habitat. Amid the boulder stacks are pinyon pines, junipers, scrub oaks, Mojave yuccas, and Mojave prickly pear cacti. The Parry's nolina sends tall feathery sprays skyward. The skeletal black-brush might look dead, but it's very much alive: it sheds its leaves during the hottest months to retain moisture.

What tells you that you are truly in the Mojave Desert is the wild-armed Joshua tree. It isn't really a tree but a species of yucca. Like other desert plants, its waxy, spiny leaves expose little surface area, efficiently conserving moisture. Joshua Tees can grow over 40 feet tall—at the leisurely rate of an inch a year. Its clusters of cream-colored flowers bloom February through April. Branching occurs after flowering.

Joshua trees—alive or dead—are home to many animals. The loggerhead shrike often impales prey on sharp-pointed leaves. Other birds to look for are the Scott's oriole, red-tailed hawk, ladder-backed woodpecker, American kestrel, and western scrub jay. The Gambel's quail, perhaps with a string of youngsters in tow, scurries from one shrub to another.

Hidden in the rocks might be a red diamond rattlesnake, its eyes on a desert spiny lizard, which in turn is searching the rocks for insects. A marvel of desert adaptation, the pinacate beetle never drinks water. It derives moisture from meals of fungus and decaying vegetation. It is also known as a circus beetle because when threatened it does a "headstand" while emitting a foul-smelling secretion.

In the early morning or late afternoon, it is not uncommon to spot a black-tailed jackrabbit racing across the landscape. Gigantic ears help regulate body temperature: in warm weather the blood vessels dilate to release heat. When it's cold, the vessels constrict to retain warmth.

COLORADO DESERT The eastern half of the park, below 3,000 feet above sea level, lies within the Colorado Desert. This habitat of the lower Colorado River valley is part of the much larger Sonoran Desert, which spans southern Arizona and northwestern Mexico. Creosote dominates this sun-baked bowl, punctuated here and there by spidery ocotillo, green-barked palo verde, and patches of jumping cholla cactus. Jumping cholla is also called teddy bear cholla, but don't try to cuddle it! Intermittent water in washes and bajadas sustains smoke trees and ironwoods.

Wildflowers abound. Red-orange blossoms of the chuparosa attract hummingbirds, for which the plant is named, as well as the tiny checker-spot butterfly. Annuals like the desert sand verbena survive drought by living only in spring and going to seed when conditions harshen. Seeds can lie dormant for several years until conditions are again favorable. Animals here display many forms of adaptation. The kangaroo rat obtains water from the food it eats—seeds, leaves, stems, and insects. It can store food for weeks in its cheek pouch. Its large hind feet are adapted for hopping over desert sand, which it does throughout the night. A kit fox, equally well-adapted to desert travel, may follow in close pursuit.

OASIS When you're at one of the park's fan-palm oases, you're atop a crack in the Earth's crust. Geological faults crisscross the park area. When groundwater hits a fault plane, it rises to the surface and creates conditions for an oasis.

Dependable surface water nourishes lush vegetation, a welcome refuge from desert extremes. Besides the majestic California fan palms, there are cottonwoods and mesquites. Look carefully and you may see un-desertlike species like orchids and amphibians.

WHO PILED UP ALL THOSE ROCKS?

Roads and trails lead you through a jumble of stacked boulders where you can use your imagination to see unlikely shapes.

The rock piles began underground eons ago as a result of volcanic activity. Magma—in this case a molten form of the rock called monzogranite—rose from deep within the Earth. As it rose, it intruded the overlying rock, the Pinto gneiss formation.

As the granite cooled and crystalized underground, cracks (joints) formed horizontally and vertically. The granite continued to uplift, where it came in contact with groundwater. Chemical weathering caused by groundwater worked on the angular granite blocks, widening cracks and rounding edges. Eventually the surface soil eroded, leaving heaps of monzogranite scattered across the land like careless piles of toy blocks.

EXPLORE JOSHUA TREE

park map
(click for larger map)

HOURS, FACILITIES, ACTIVITIES Joshua Tree Visitor Center, Oasis Visitor Center, and Cottonwood Visitor Center are open daily. Black Rock Nature Center is open October through May. All visitor centers have exhibits, information on things to see and do, and Joshua Tree National Park Association bookstores. Ranger-guided programs are offered year-round. Desert Institute classes run fall, winter, and spring.

HIKING, CAMPING, CLIMBING There are trails for everyone, from paved, wheelchair-accessible trails to strenuous hikes. For wilderness backpacking you must park and register at a backcountry board. Picnic areas and campgrounds have tables, fire rings, and toilets. Most campgrounds do not have water. Rock climbing information is available at entrance stations, visitor centers, and the park website.

GETTING TO THE PARK The park is 140 miles (225 km) east of Los Angeles. From I-10, take CA 62 to the entrance stations. You can also enter the park from the south off I-10 at Cottonwood Spring, 25 miles (40 km) east of Indio.

THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW People have died here from preventable accidents. • There is no cell phone coverage in the majority of the park. • Stay away from abandoned mines. • Supervise children, particularly around cacti and climbable rocks. • Carry at least one gallon of water per person per day. • Flash floods are a danger; avoid drainage areas during and after thunderstorms or severe weather. • Do not climb unless you are properly trained and equipped. Be careful where you put your hands and feet, especially in spring and summer when snakes are active. • Pets must be leashed at all times; pets are prohibited on trails and beyond 100 feet (30 m) from any park road, campground, or picnic area. • All motorized vehicles and bicycles must stay on established roads. Obey posted speed limits. Park in designated parking areas, not roadside. Off-road driving is prohibited. • Camping is allowed only in designated areas or with a wilderness backpacking registration. • Federal law protects natural and cultural features. Do not disturb, mutilate, deface, or remove any natural or cultural objects. • Observing wildlife with artificial lights is prohibited. • For firearms regulations check the park website. • Emergency phones are located at Indian Cove Ranger Station and Intersection Rock.

Emergencies call 911

ACCESSIBILITY We strive to make our facilities, services, and programs accessible to all. For information go to a visitor center, ask a ranger, call, or check our website.

WILDERNESS Congress has designated nearly 558,000 acres of Joshua Tree National Park as wilderness. Most of the park away from road corridors is wilderness. If you plan to venture into these areas, you must be familiar with special rules and regulations governing wilderness use.

Source: NPS Brochure (2019)


Establishment

Joshua Tree National Park — Oct. 31, 1994
Biosphere Reserve — 1984
Joshua Tree National Monument — Aug. 16, 1936


For More Information
Please Visit The
Link to Official NPS Website
OFFICIAL NPS
WEBSITE


Brochures ◆ Site Bulletins ◆ Trading Cards expand section

Documents

A Floristic and Ecological Study of the Palm Oases of Joshua Tree National Monument (Larwrence T. McHargue, 1969)

A History of Joshua Tree National Monument (Samuel King, W. Egbert Schenck and Frank R. Givens, 1954)

A History of Joshua Tree National Monument (Samuel King, 1954)

A Linkage Design for the Joshua Tree-Twentynine Palms Connection (Kristeen Penrod, Clint R. Cabañero, Paul Beier, Claudia Luke, Wayne Spencer, Esther Rubin and Candace Paulman, December 2008)

A Report of the Joshua Tree Regional Trails Project: Trail Access Points Into Joshua Tree National Park (August 1996)

A Socioeconomic Atlas for Joshua Tree National Park and its Region (Jean E. McKendry, Kimberly L. Treadway, Gary E. Machlis, Roger B. Schlegel and Adam J. Novak, 2001)

A Study of Rock Climbers in Joshua Tree National Park: Implications for the Visitor Experience and Resource Protection (VERP) Management Framework Final Report (George N. Wallace and Kesia Trench, June 1996)

Accessibility Self-Evaluation and Transition Plan, Joshua Tree National Park, California Draft (August 2018)

Amphibians and Reptiles of Joshua Tree National Park (Harold F. De Lisle, 2001)

An Archeological Survey of the Twenty Nine Palms Region Southwest Museum Papers No. 7 (Elizabeth W. Crozer Campbell, November 1931, reprinted 1963)

Analytical results and sample locality maps for rock, stream-sediment, and soil samples, Joshua Tree National Park, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, California USGS Open-File Report 99-367-A (H.D. King and M.A. Chaffee, 1999)

Annual Report: 1986 — Cooperative National Park Resources Studies Unit (December 31, 1986)

Anthropogenic Climate Change in Joshua Tree National Park, California, USA (Patrick Gonzalez, July 26, 2019)

Appraisal of Mineral Interests Inherent in the Kaiser Steel Corporation Properties in the Placer-Mystery Canyon Areas within the Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside, California (January 1975)

Aviation Management Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (November 24, 2002)

Backcountry and Wilderness Management Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (January 2000)

Bighorn Guzzlers in Joshua Tree National Park Draft (Jane Ashdown, November 2002)

Boundary II Prescribed Burning Unit Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (July 26, 1997)

Boundary Buffer Prescribed Burn Unit Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (August 11, 1995)

California's National Parks in Peril: The Threats of Climate Disruption (Stephen Saunders and Tom Easley, ©The Rocky Mountain Climate Organization and Natural Resources Defense Council, October 2010, all rights reserved)

Climbing Management Plan, Joshua Tree National Monument (1993)

Congruence between future distribution models and empirical data for an iconic species at Joshua Tree National Park (Lynn C. Sweet, Tyler Green, James G. C. Heintz, Neil Frakes, Nicolas Graver, Jeff S. Rangitsch, Jane E. Rodgers, Scott Heacox, and Cameron W. Barrows, extract from Ecosphere, Vol. 10(6), June 2019)

Conservation Assessment for Parish’s Daisy (Erigeron parishii, Asteraceae) in Joshua Tree National Park NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/JOTR/NRR—2014/887 (Naomi S. Fraga, Linda Prince, Tasha La Doux, Mitzi Harding and Josh Hoines, November 2014)

Construct New West Entrance Fee Station Environmental Assessment, Joshua Tree National Park (February 2022)

Country Nodes: An Anthropological Evaluation of William Keys' Desert Queen Ranch, Joshua Tree National Monument, California (HTML edition) Western Archeological Center Publications in Anthropology No. 7 (Patricia Parker Hickman, 1977)

Custodian's Annual Report, Joshua Tree National Monument: undated, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947

Eagle Mountain Boundary Study Including Possible Land Withdrawal Environmental Assessment - Final, Joshua Tree National Park (December 2016)

Ecology of Desert Plants. IV. Combined Field and Laboratory Work on Germination of Annuals in the Joshua Tree National Monument, California (Marcella Juhren, F.W. Went and Edwin Phillips, extract from Ecology, Vol. 37 No. 2, April 1956)

Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Modification of VR-1257, Joshua Tree National Park (March 1999)

Environmental Compliance for Fire Management Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (October 5, 2005)

Fee Demonstration Projects, Joshua Tree National Park (Vol. 3 No. 1, June 2001)

Fee Program Operations Manual, Joshua Tree National Park (February 1, 2010)

Fifty Years of Archeology in the California Desert: An Archeological Overview of Joshua Tree National Monument Western Archeological and Conservation Center Publications in Anthropology No. 2 (Thomas F. King, 1975)

Fire Behavior and Ecological Effects in Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) Shrubland and Invasive Annual Grasslands of the Mojave Desert Study Plan (August 20, 2001)

Fire Effects Research Study Environmental Assessment, Joshua Tree National Park (2003)

Fire Management Plan, 1992 Revision, Joshua Tree National Park (September 1992)

Fire Management Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (October 2005)

Fire Management Plan Environmental Assessment, Joshua Tree National Park (April 2005)

Fire Management Program (Prescribed Natural Fire) Environmental Assessment, Joshua Tree National Park (Tom Patterson and Bob Moon, c1992)

Flora and Fauna, Joshua Tree National Monument (undated)

Foundation Statement, Joshua Tree National Park, California (October 2011)

Foundation Document, Joshua Tree National Park, California (F4 Draft, November 2014)

Foundation Document, Joshua Tree National Park, California (January 2015)

Foundation Document Overview, Joshua Tree National Park, California (March 2015)

General Management Plan, Development Concept Plans, Environmental Impact Statement: Joshua Tree National Park, California (1995)

Geology of the Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties (D.D. Trent, extract from California Geology, April 1984)

Geology of the Joshua Tree National Park, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties / Mines in Joshua Tree National Park (D.D. Trent, extract from California Geology, September/October 1998)

Ground-water and related geology of Joshua Tree National Monument, California USGS Open-File Report 63-137 (J.E. Weir Jr. and J.S. Bader, 1963)

Groundwater Level Declines at the Oasis of Mara, Joshua Tree National Park, 1940-2015 NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/MOJN/NRR-2016/1242 (Geoff J.M. Moret, Sarah Wright, Jennifer L. Bailard and Luke Sabala, June 2016)

HIPPROTECT at Joshua Tree National Park (September 1997)

Historic American Building Survey: Desert Queen Ranch / Keys Ranch House HABS No. CA0-2347-A (undated)

Historic Resource Study: A History of Land Use, Joshua Tree National Monument (Linda W. Greene, September 1983)

Historic Resource Study: New Lands, Old Lands: A History of the Lands Added to Joshua Tree National Park, California Draft (Donald Hardesty and Jessica Smith, September 27, 2006)

Historic Structures Report: Lost Horse Mine, Joshua Tree National Monument: Part 1—Historical Data including Administrative Data (Benjamin Levy, March 17, 1969)

Honeybee Response Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (February 2014)

Horse Use Policy, Joshua Tree National Monument (March 3, 1988)

Hydrologic and geologic reconnaissance of Pinto basin, Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside County, California USGS Water Supply Paper 1475-O (Fred Kunkel, 1963)

Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks of the Western Portion of Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California California Division of Mines: Special Report 68 (John J.W. Rogers, 1961)

Impacts of Visitor Spending on the Local Economy: Joshua Tree National Park, 2004 (Daniel J. Stynes, June 2006)

Interpretive Prospectus, Joshua Tree National Park, California (December 1996)

Joshua Tree National Monument: A Brief History (undated)

Joshua Tree National Park: A History of Preserving the Desert — Administrative History (Lary M. Dilsaver, March 2015)

Joshua Tree National Park Business Plan — Fiscal Year 2001 (2002)

Joshua Tree National Park Transit Feasibility Study (Sarah Hernandez, Alma Carrillo and Allison Rodriguez for Institute of Transportation Engineers Student Chapter, June 30, 2014)

Joshua Tree's Aircraft Warning Stations (Jeff Ohlfs, extract from Twentynine Palms Historical Society Old Schoolhouse Journal, Spring 2012)

Joshua Trees — Rate of Growth (Letter from Frank R. Givens to Region Four Regional Director, March 24, 1953)

Junior Ranger: A publication for kids produced by Joshua Tree National Park (Vol. 1 No. 1, undated)

Juniper Fire Comple Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (June 7, 1999)

Keys' Desert Queen Ranch Preservation Study, Joshua Tree National Monument (Gordon Chappell, Robert Cox and Roger Kelly, 1975)

Keys Ranch: Where Time Stood Still Teaching with Historic Places Lesson Plan Series (undated)

Keys View Road Reconstruction Environmental Assessment/Assessment of Effect (April 2005)

Land Donations: 1946-1949, Joshua Tree (1946-1949)

Management Significance of Home Ranges and Diets of Coyotes in Joshua Tree National Monument in Relation to Prey Densities CPSU/UNLV Contribution No. 009/16 (John Cornely, January 13, 1981)

Mapbook: Morongo Basin — Topographic Maps: Yucca Valley, Joshua Tree, 29 Palms, Morongo Valley (undated)

Mapbook: Northeast Region — Topographic Maps of Pinto Basin, Coxcomb Mtns, Mission Millsite (undated)

Mapbook: Northwest Region — Topographic Maps of the Wonderland of Rocks and surrounding areas (undated)

Mapbook: Southeast Region — Topographic Maps of the Eagle Mtns, Munson Canyon, Coxcomb Mtns (undated)

Mapbook: Southwest Region — Topographic Maps of Cottonwood Spring, Lost Palms, Berdoo Canyon (undated)

Mining Claims Within the Boundaries of Joshua Tree National Park: A Report on Claim Status (March 26, 1997)

Mojave Desert Discovery: An Educator's Guide to the Cultural and Natural History of Death Valley National Monument, East Mojave National Scenic Area, Joshua Tree National Monument, Lake Mead National Recreation Area and Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area (1994)

Mojave Desert Network Selected Large Springs Pilot Study: Joshua Tree National Park 2014 Data Report NPS Natural Resource Data Series NPS/MOJN/NRDS-2015/794 (Jennifer L. Bailard and Geoffrey J.M. Moret, May 2015)

Money Generation Model (MGM), Joshua Tree National Park (1998)

Monitoring Ecosystem Quality and Function in Arid Settings of the Mojave Desert USGS Scientific Investigation Report 2008-5064 (Jayne Belnap, Robert H. Webb, Mark E. Miller, David M. Miller, Lelsey A. DeFalco, Philip A. Medica, Matthew L. Brooks, Todd C. Esque and Dave Bedford, 2008)

Museum Management Plan, Joshua Tree National Park Draft (Kent Bush, Kelly Cahill, Blair Davenport, Diane Nicholson, Khaleel Saba and Melanie Spoo, 2005)

Name Changes: Joshua Tree, Salton/Keys View, Stubbe Spring, Joshua Tree National Park (1951-1961)

National Register of Historic Places Nomination Forms

Barker Dam (Gordon Chappell and F.R. Holland, Jr., 1971, June 11, 1975)

Cow Camp (Gordon Chappell and F.R. Holland, Jr., 1971, 1975)

Desert Queen Mine (Gordon Chappell and F.R. Holland, Jr., 1971, June 10, 1975)

Keys' Ranch / Desert Queen Ranch / McHaney Ranch (Gordon Chappell and F.R. Holland, Jr., 1971, 1975)

Ryan House and Lost Horst Well or Spring (F. Ross Holland, Jr., December 1971)

Wall Street Mill (Gordon Chappell, June 10, 1975)

Natural Resource Condition Assessments for Six Parks in the Mojave Desert Network NPS Natural Resource Report NPS/MOJN/NRR-2019/1959 (Erica Fleishman, Christine Albano, Bethany A. Bradley, Tyler G. Creech, Caroline Curtis, Brett G. Dickson, Clinton W. Epps, Ericka E. Hegeman, Cerissa Hoglander, Matthias Leu, Nicole Shaw, Mark W. Schwartz, Anthony VanCuren and Luke Z. Zachmann, August 2019)

Natural Resource Management Program: An Addendum to the Natural Resource Management Plan for Joshua Tree National Monument, California (January 1985)

New Employee Handbook, Joshua Tree National Park (July 2015)

Notes and Pictures Relative to Proposed Army Maneuver Road at Joshua Tree National Monument (Ernest A. Davidson, February 25, 1943)

Notes of an Interview with William H. McHaney (W.E. Ketcham and W. Egbert Schenck, March 1933)

Official Junior Ranger Program and Activity Booklet, Joshua Tree National Park (2010)

One Hundred Years in the California Desert: An Overview of Historic Archeological Resources at Joshua Tree National Monument Western Archeological and Conservation Center Publications in Anthropology No. 13 (Patricia Parker, 1980)

Oral History: Herman Price (Interview conducted April 10, 1962)

Park Newspaper: 75th Anniversary (2011)

Park Newspaper (Joshua Tree Journal)

1988: Summer

1989: Spring/Summer

1990: Fall/Winter

1991: Spring/SummerFall/Winter

1992: Spring/SummerFall/Winter

1993: Spring/SummerFall/Winter

1994: SpringSummer

Park Newspaper (Joshua Tree Guide)

1996199719981998-1999

1999: SpringFall

2000: Fall

2001: SpringFall

2002: SpringFall

2003: SpringFall

2004: Spring (1)Spring (2)Fall

2005: SpringFall

2006: SpringSummerFall

2007: SpringSummerFall

2008: SpringFall

2009: 20092009-2010

2011: 2011 (1)2011 (2)

2012: 2012 (1)2012 (2)2012 (3)

2013: 2013

2014: 2014

2015: Fall 2014-SpringSummerFall

2016: SpringSummerFall

2017: SpringSummerFall

2018: SpringSummer

2019: Summer

2020: Fall 2019 - Spring

Pet Policy, Joshua Tree National Park Management Directive (June 2001)

Planning for the future: A program for preserving and interpreting paleontology and geology in Joshua Tree National Park (Eric Scott, Kathleen Springer, J. Christopher Sagebiel and Craig R. Manker, New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science Bulletin 34, 2006, ©New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, all rights reserved)

Preliminary Issues and Concerns — Public Scoping: Construct New West Entrance Station, Joshua Tree National Park (2022)

Privileges & Permits: Surgical Wood Splints (March 1942)

Proposed Name Change: Desert Plant National Monument (1936-1951)

Proposed National Monument (Roger W. Toll, 1933-1934)

Proposed Natural Resources Management Plan Environmental Assessment, Joshua Tree National Monument, California (1974)

Public Service Announcements: July 7, 1994July 14, 1994 (Debbie Ohlfs)

Rehabilitation of Main Park Road/Cap Rock Intersection to Geology Tour Road Environmental Assessment, Joshua Tree National Park (August 2002)

Report on the Validity of the Lucky Boy Claim, Unpatented Lode Claim, Joshua Tree National Park, Riverside County, California (May 1973)

Report on the Validity of the Ruby Lee Lode Claim and Millsite Claim, Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside County, California (1974)

Resource Stewardship Strategy, Joshua Tree National Park Draft (2013)

Scholar's Reports by Cindy Ott, Laura Watt, and Raymond Rast of a visit to Joshua Tree National Park, June 10-12, 2008 (c2008)

Search and Rescue Plan, Joshua Tree National Park (September 1984)

Self-guided Geologic Tour in Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside County, California (Don Dupras, extract from California Geology, Vol 44. No. 9, September 1990)

Social Trails: Restoring Fragile Desert Landscapes (undated)

Special Report on the Joshua Tree National Monument with Reference to Antelope and Bighorn (E. Lowell Sumner, Jr., March 28, 1940)

Special Park Uses Guideline, Joshua Tree National Park (1995)

Special Park Uses Guideline, Joshua Tree National Park (2004)

S.S. Joshua Tree (Jeff Ohlfs and Todd Swain, extract from Twentynine Palms Historical Society Old Schoolhouse Journal, Fall 2005)

Statement for Management 1982, Joshua Tree National Monument (April 1982)

Superintendent's Annual Report, Joshua Tree National Monument: 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993

Superintendent's Annual Report, Joshua Tree National Park: 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011

Superintendent's Quarterly Report, Joshua Tree National Park: January-March 2004, April-June 2004, July-September 2004

Survey And Excavations in Joshua Tree National Monument Western Archeological and Conservation Center Publications in Anthropology No. 32 (Richard G. Ervin, 1985)

The Blue Cut Fault, Southern California USGS Professional Paper No. 650-D (Roger A. Hope, 1969)

The Desert Training Center / California-Arizona Maneuver Area, 1942-1944: Historical and Archaeological Contexts SRI Technical Series No. 75 (Matt C. Bischoff, June 2000)

The Impact of Human Disturbance on Desert Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) in the Wonderland of Rocks / Queen Mountain Region of Joshua Tree National Park, California (Daniel Thompson, Kethleen Longshore with Chris Lowrey, May 16, 2007)

The Lichen Flora of Joshua Tree National Park: An Annotated Checklist NPS Natural Resource Technical Report NPS/JOTR/NRTR-2013/743 (Kerry Knudsen, Mitzi Harding and Josh Hoines, May 2013)

The Mojave and Colorado Desert Biosphere Reserve Educational Bulletin #90-4 (Bill Truesdell, undated)

The Native American Ethnography and Ethnohistory of Joshua Tree National Park: An Overview (HTML edition) (Lowell John Bean, August 22, 2002)

The Oasis (Mojave Desert Network)

2014: SpringFall

2015: SpringFall

2016: SpringFall

2017: SpringFall

2020: SpringFall

The Oasis of Mara Visitor Information and Cultural Center: A Partnership Venture by the City of Twentynine Palms and Joshua Tree National Park (c2002)

The Pinto Basin Site Southwest Museum Papers No. 9 (Elizabeth W. Crozer Campbell and William H. Campbell, March 1935, reprinted 1963)

The Road Inventory of Joshua Tree National Park (Federal Highway Administration, February 1999)

VIP Program Guidelines, Joshua Tree National Park (undated)

VIP Program Guidelines, Joshua Tree National Park (undated)

Visitor Characteristics Across and Within Seasons at Joshua Tree National Park: 2019 Research Report (Elizabeth E. Perry, Matthew T.J. Brownlee, Robert Powell and Ryan Sharp, November 2020)

Wilderness Recommendation, Joshua Tree National Monument, California (August 1972)

Wilderness Study, Joshua Tree National Monument (August 1971)

Work Plan (Goals and Objectives): 1994-199919961997200620072009



Handbooks ◆ Books expand section

Videos

Joshua Tree National Park



jotr/index.htm
Last Updated: 14-Mar-2022